How to visualize global digital culture?

As Lev Manovich said (2009,p.1), ‘we are living through an exponential explosion in the amounts of data we are generating, capturing, analyzing, visualizing and storing — including cultural content.’ Data and cultural contents we created spread widely and flow globally by the helping of digital tools in today’s modern society. And this is how global digital culture generated.

In order to identify the most useful and related information in the age with overloaded contents, finding a way to visualize and analysis the digital culture could be very helpful. And data could be the most important resource to assist us to complete the task. Manovich (2009) offered a list of companies which analysis the behavior of their customers successfully by tracking and visualizing the data, most of them are global online social and digital companies. Information generated via Internet normally is traceable. For collecting and gathering data clearly, information should be classified and categorized. Social media did this job very well. Because most of social media is encourage their users to classify the information when they producing the content, such as by using hashtag to unload content about one certain topic. Moreover, Manovich (2009, p.8) notes that ‘Media content in digital form is not the only type of data that we can analyze quantitatively to potentially reveal new cultural patterns. Computers also allow us to capture and subsequently analyze many dimensions of human cultural activities that could not be recorded before.’

With the developing of today’s technologies, digital culture would be an open and visible resource towards the publics, especially culture content creators and users. ‘ So they themselves can analyze any type of cultural content in detail and use results of this analysis in new ways’ (Manovick 2009, p. 13).

Reference:

Manovich, L. (2009). How to Follow Global Digital Cultures, or Cultural Analytics for Beginners. In Deep Search, eds. Felix Stalder and Konrad Becker. Transaction Publishers.

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