Dude at work is having problems with his iPhone and it got me thinking about basic tech housekeeping. His problem on the face of it seemed simple. He’s bought a new iPhone (6S) to replace his old phone (5S). He’s also got an old MacBook Pro.

As he tells the story, he is unable to do a wireless backup to the old iPhone to enable him to restore to the new one. From what I can gather, he has managed to backup some items, but not all.

I had a play around with it and I could see that the old phone was just not doing a backup. As such I suggested that he remove some apps that maybe he didn’t want, clear out some old photos and give the phone a general clean out (even though he didn’t appear to be short of space, either on the phone itself or iCloud). The subsequent outcome has been to USB/lightning connect the phone to iTunes and do a backup that way. It has worked but some stuff seems to be missing from his Mac.

Anyway, it made me realise that I have a pretty robust housekeeping process for my tech and that actually, as long as I stick to it, my gadgets seem to tick along nicely (of course, as soon as I publish this post, it will all pack in). I’m not bragging!

What do I do that my colleague doesn’t? Well, some of the things are as follows.

Keyboard Pic

Quarterly photo clear out and back up.

I have my iPhone automatically backup to My Cloud so it’s not such a big deal for me to delete old photos. However, before I do that, I make a point of doing a manual photo backup to my home PC, so as to essentially make a backup of a backup. Then I delete the photos I don’t want. This way, I hope that I have all bases covered as best one can.

Regular OS and app updates.

I don’t do automatic app updates (although I’m thinking about it). Instead, I tend to do a bi-weekly or monthly catch up on any app updates to make sure everything is running smoothly. Usually, by this point, any kinks have been ironed out. Similarly, with OS updates I do tend to be an early adopter and download the updates/new OS as soon as I can. I do enjoy a new OS.

Quarterly app deletion.

We all have apps that we keep out of sentimental or rainy day reasons. If I find that I haven’t used a piece of software for 6 months I tend to delete it, unless, it is something that I know I’ll get pleasure from once in a blue moon (Lightsaber app being a prime example). By doing this, I find that I can get back a good bit of space that otherwise vanishes simply because the system is clogged.

Internal app maintenance.

Photos and Notes are of course two apps that I make a point of ensuring are clean and up-to-date. Similarly, I find apps like Pocket can get really full quickly. I try and make a point of on a monthly basis going through my Pocket articles and deleting and archiving.

Regularly close downs apps from multitasking.

I’m terrible for letting apps just run and run but I’ve got better over the last few years of ensuring that I close things down. I know from conversations with friends and colleagues that most people are shit at this!

Regularly check space and storage (including iCloud).

I often go into settings and check where I’m at with phone space and iCloud space. This is your guide to deciding whether a spring clean is necessary.

What steps do you take to ensure your tech is performing at its best?

Originally published on Wordpress

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