“Linking ableism to other forms of oppression is also critical.”

Color headshot of Catherine Hyde Townsend, a white woman who is smiling

“Developing relationships between community leaders and philanthropic staff is essential. These social networks not only inform grant-making decisions, but also help reinforce learning and understanding of the disability community. It’s also one of the hardest things to do.”

Name or Anonymous:

Please share how you prefer to introduce yourself:


“Good introductions should be considered part of universal design.”

Color photo of Alex Tabony, a white man, looking relaxed and happy

“Employers are often focused on obtaining the ‘best and the brightest’ and have defined that, in part, as having a profile that typically PWD (people with disabilities) do not have because of missed developmental opportunities and/or non-traditional backgrounds for the position.”

Name or Anonymous:

Please share how you prefer to introduce yourself:


“The biggest gap in organizational commitments to disability inclusion continues to be a lack of inclusive hiring.”

Color photo of Emily Ladau, a youthful white woman, sitting and smiling

“Currently, it seems a lot of organizations are beginning to recognize disability as an area for funding, but it’s time to move beyond a charity perspective. “

Name or Anonymous:

Please share how you prefer to introduce yourself:


“Philanthropy is not different than other fields. If there isn’t meaningful inclusion of disability across the organization, ableism is occurring.”

Photo of Judy Heumann in her powerchair, laughing

“My most positive experience was working at The Ford Foundation when they wanted to learn about barriers we face and what Ford needed to do to become more educated and inclusive.”

Name or Anonymous:

Please share how you prefer to introduce yourself:


“My fundraising career has been very affected by the income restrictions imposed by public benefits systems.”

Color photo of Cara Liebowitz, a youthful white woman with shoulder-length brown hair and glasses, who is smiling.

“It’s hard to work in this sector and to be asking mostly people with disabilities for money. People with disabilities are disproportionately low income, and the system keeps us poor… And if foundations aren’t interested in funding disability rights and individual donors just can’t give enough, where does that leave us?”

Name:

Please share how you prefer to introduce yourself:

Your pronouns are:

Current Job Title(s) and Organization(s) (if applicable):


"To say that we can only be charity recipients is another way our community is dehumanized.”

Color photo of Tiffany Yu, an Asian-American woman in a bright blue shirt, looking off to the side and smiling.

“I look to other movements for best practices and learnings that we can bring back to the disability community. I also acknowledge that we are still working on making all of our movements more intersectional.”

Name:

Please share how you prefer to introduce yourself:


“I would like to see nonprofits and NGOs all around the world have more power in relation to philanthropy.”

Marsha Saxton, a white woman of middle-age who has short blonde hair and is wearing a pleasant expression.

“I would like younger leaders, women and people with disabilities, to not have to go through the tokenization that I experienced as a younger person. I submitted to this because I didn’t really recognize what was happening to me at the time, and was afraid, and made to feel grateful to have a meeting or participate in conference with philanthropy.”

Name:

Please share how you prefer to introduce yourself:


“There needs to be targeted outreach to the disability community to recruit people into philanthropy. Philanthropy has to deal with its elitism, classism, and lack of diversity.”

“The philanthropic field has a lot of work to do to learn and reflect on systemic ableism, and take concrete steps (not just lip service) on how their actions and policies reflect their commitment to anti-ableism.”

Name:

Please share how you prefer to introduce yourself:


“I was once asked to serve on an evaluation committee that didn’t mention an honorarium and when asked, they replied that they didn’t generally pay volunteers. My response to that absurdity was that this was a policy they should revisit because evaluating applications is a good deal of work…Long story short, they gave my feedback consideration and their parent funder freed up more funding so that they were able to pay the entire evaluation committee. I was asked again and agreed to take on the evaluation responsibility under paid conditions that valued my time as a disabled person.”

A light complected black woman with dark brown hair pulled up into a bun, wearing light makeup and blue earrings, smiling.

“Sometimes I feel like there is a lack of racial and cultural understanding/comprehension that does become a barrier.”

Please share how you prefer to introduce yourself:


“The idea of disabled people supporting disabled-led projects resonated with the community organizer side of me that does not often have access to being on the other side of the philanthropic world, as grantors.” -Sandy Ho

Sandy Ho, an Asian American woman with dark curly hair sits in a black power wheelchair. She is wearing a blue tshirt.

“Either I risked losing money because I made “too much” income, or I risked losing it because I didn’t fill out the bottomless pit of forms every year as required by the government. In that sense I internalized money and the concept of philanthropy as something that wasn’t meant for me to access.”

Please share how you prefer to introduce yourself:

Disabled in Development Project

Stigma-busting tales of bringing our disabilities, chronic illnesses, and aging to our work in philanthropy and fundraising. Created by @IngridTischer ♿️✍️💰

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store