Decorating your Agile Product — evolving through DIY thinking

Without realising it, thousands of people around the world are embarking on the journey of building agile products every day.

These people aren’t CEO’s of a tech company, they aren’t Product Managers, and in fact, they may not work in tech at all.

They’re homeowners. They’re renters. They’re DIYers.

In this multi-part post I’ll cover a new way of thinking about your Agile Product problems, delivery and stakeholder explanations — DIY thinking.


With the DIY market set to grow by over 10% in the next 5 years, and sites like Pinterest and Houzz building their names on people viewing and sharing images of their ideal rooms, the majority of people reading this will at some point have at least considered a re-decoration of a room in their abode.

What many of you may not realise is, that by embarking on that journey you have, in fact, embarked on the process of building an agile product.

Step 1: Decide something needs to be done

Photo by Sarah Diniz Outeiro on Unsplash

The first step in updating any space is defining your problem. Your room has fallen into disrepair — years of small changes have led to it being a patchwork of ideas that no longer form a cohesive structure.

Perhaps the colour scheme has fallen out of favour, the furniture needs frequent oiling or your friends have all had extensions and you just need to keep up with the Joneses.

Those of us who work in Product may now be seeing the some similarities that they deal with on a daily basis —a few tweaks here and there and we have just defined the situation the majority of Product Managers face on a day-to-day basis.

The first step in updating any product is defining your problem. Your product has fallen into disrepair — years of small changes have led to it being a patchwork of ideas that no longer form a cohesive structure.
Perhaps the UI has fallen out of favour, the features needs frequent bug fixes or your competitors have all released new versions and you just need to keep up with the Joneses.

So we now know that something needs to be done. But realising that something needs to be done is only the start. Defining what needs to be done is where a Product Manager proves their true value.

New furniture, a coat of paint, changing the carpet or a complete overhaul — that requires the next stage of DIY thinking…

With my next post I’ll cover Step 2: Defining Your Problem