It seems journalists are either “heading to Substack” or joining the New York Times. Here’s why.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Jeremy Bishop on Unsplash

Recently, a number of journalists have left their positions at various media outlets. With the help of tools provided by tech upstart Substack, they’re venturing out on their own and attempting to monetize their readers directly. It’s DTC, but for journalism.

But not all journalists and media personalities are following that path. Some of the most prominent have instead chosen to embrace an equally prominent institution — The New York Times.

As Sara Fischer outlines for Axios, a number of well-known reporters, writers, and analysts have opted to leave their organizations and join the Times. Despite what you hear from some critics, the Times has been performing quite well financially. While it has experienced its fair share of difficulties, it has continued to be a leader in news and culture, using unique and beloved products like crossword puzzles and recipes to earn new subscriptions and leaning in heavily in areas primed for growth, like podcasting. …


A quick history of the streaming service and a look into its future as part of Disney

Image for post
Image for post
It’s been a long and winding road. Photo by Kees Streefkerk on Unsplash

The story of Hulu has more twists and turns than almost anything you could watch on the service itself. Hulu has always had multiple owners with competing priorities and has never reached its true potential. But somehow, 13 years after its founding, it remains one of the most recognizable, important, and utilized streaming services in the US.

Here is a quick rundown of Hulu’s recent history. Until recently, 21st Century Fox, Disney, and Comcast each held 30% of the company, while AT&T held 10%. Then, Disney acquired 21st Century Fox and AT&T divested. …


With plenty of players, consumers, and even goals, the competition for prominence in the next generation of video delivery is less of a war and more of a maze

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Benjamin Elliott on Unsplash

People are watching more video than ever. If one only read headlines and looked at topline data, they might be mystified about such a proclamation. According to eMarketer, traditional Pay TV is down almost 25% since its peak in 2014. Even when including vMVPD’s, which buoyed the industry for a bit, the downward trend is undeniable.

But while traditional Pay TV has faltered, SVOD and AVOD have exploded, with new services launching all the time. There are dominant players like Netflix and Disney+ who have sworn by the idea of a commercial-free experience and blockbuster programming. These players steal most of the headlines and have created a situation that many — including yours truly — have referred to as the “Streaming Wars.” …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Edwin Andrade on Unsplash

A few years ago, I read a book by Alyssa Mastromonaco, who served in the Obama Administration as a Deputy Chief of Staff. It was fascinating for a number of reasons — descriptions of the mechanizations of the White House, her rather quick rise, the unique opportunities she had to travel internationally and meet world leaders — but the book didn’t stick with me because of any of the more obvious subject matter. Instead, it’s what comes after her experience at the White House that left an impact. After Mastromonaco left the White House, she quickly dropped into a bit of a depression. She didn’t feel as though she had accomplished anything and she didn’t have any purpose. It all gets quite meta as she describes how difficult it was for her to actually write the book. …


Exploring how parables illustrate mercy and teach us to go above and beyond what is expected. If, that is, we’re willing to listen.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Hannes on Unsplash

The Prodigal Son. The Good Samaritan. The house built upon the rocks. These stories are familiar to anyone who is familiar with the Gospels, the part of the Bible that tells of Jesus’ life on Earth. In fact, even many who do not know the Bible and have never read it likely recognize these stories.

Collectively, these stories are known are parables, and Jesus used them extensively throughout His ministry to illustrate His points. He also used parables to help describe the nearly indescribable, or to give an example of how one who was abiding by His commands might behave. Oftentimes, these stories left listeners amazed and speechless. …


From political conventions to professional wrestling, forming up some best practices for broadcasting during the pandemic

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Claire P on Unsplash

This month’s political conventions — last week’s DNC and this week’s RNC — are going to be extremely unique. Instead of raucous stadiums and a seemingly endless list of events, the conventions are giving us 8 tidy hours of primetime programming. Delivered in 2-hour segments and punctuated with key speeches, they look more like a telethon than a political convention. I mean hey, they even ask for donations!

Of course, only the DNC has actually happened. Whether the RNC will bear much resemblance to that event is yet to be determined. Still, from professional sports to late night shows to the WWE, we’ve had plenty of examples of virtual events. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Morning Brew on Unsplash

When one considers why Apple is worth almost $2 trillion, the first thing that comes to mind is likely its dominance in consumer hardware. iPhones, iPads, Macs, Air Pods, and Apple Watches cost a pretty penny. Indeed, the company makes a boatload of cash from that part of its business. But as technology improves and people feel less of a need to buy a new phone every two years, Apple has had to look elsewhere.

This has led Apple to lean into providing “services”. That includes much written about products like Apple TV+, Apple News, and Apple Arcade. It includes Apple Care, that pesky extra tax I always pay for because Lord help me if I drop my new iPad. It also includes the App Store. …


Three key themes we can pull from the reorg

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by AbsolutVision on Unsplash

Late last week, news broke of a major reorganization at the top of WarnerMedia. New WarnerMedia CEO Jason Kilar, who reports to AT&T CEO John Stankey and has only been with the company since May, made some major moves. You can read about the specifics in the articles below, but long story short Kilar streamlined the organization and, in the process, removed 3 major executives.

While evaluating the politics and executive maneuvering that happens inside of any organization’s senior levels is a tall task, I would like to explore some of what we can learn from this shakeup.

Launches Matter

First up, you can decipher that there is some measure of unhappiness from AT&T CEO John Stankey. After all, Kilar was announced in April and started in May. This was right before HBO Max was about to launch (May 27) and well after it had been announced, designed, and advertised. It isn’t like Stankey didn’t know what Kilar was thinking of doing once he took over. The decisions here were made during the…uh…very interesting HBO Max launch process. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Jonas Leupe on Unsplash

After almost a year of existence, Apple TV+ is still trying to find its best path forward. It launched with a limited number of buzzy original series and not much else, which seemed to indicate an approach that focused on prestige and on series over feature films. Recently, though, this has shifted. Apple has reportedly been in the market for older shows, hoping to build a back catalog that will allow them to offer more content without paying to make all of it themselves.

At the same time, Apple is looking to expand beyond original series and into original movies. The first big film to debut on Apple TV+, Tom Hanks’ Greyhound, became available earlier this month. The film was initially going to be shown in theaters this summer, but the pandemic made that impossible. Sony, who had distribution rights, decided it would rather sell the movie than wait it out. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Fabian Blank on Unsplash

I’ve been watching The Mindy Project on Hulu recently. It’s a comfort show that’s enjoyable but doesn’t require my full attention. As I’ve been binging the show, I’ve gotten to know a few characters who aren’t a part of The Mindy Project, but who have been closely intertwined with my experience watching it. There’s a counselor who teaches people to be less like their parents. There’s an ambitious young sign-spinner, convinced that spinning the sign is strengthening his arms and so committed to his craft that he often falls asleep on the couch with the sign. His partner is unimpressed. …

About

Lucas Quagliata

Marketing Strategist | Philadelphian | Routinely Disappointed Buffalo Bills Fan

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store