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Septemberfest

This past weekend, the Permian Basin experienced severe flooding, to the point that Friday on the way home from Odessa, frontage roads had long lines and two of the highways in town were recommended as no travel zones. Smartphones had been ringing flash flood warnings the whole day. Consequently, there wasn’t much desire to travel or do outside activity.

That didn’t stop Septemberfest from happening over the weekend, a three day event in which tents are set up at the Museum of the Southwest and artisans from across the state show their creative work.

The park was on lockdown from Friday evening on, food trucks on the side and the entrepreneurs strutting everything from Picassan Cowboy paintings to triangular hanging metal sculptures. Custom jewelry, pottery, a myriad of painting and graphic art, wood carving, and of course wine and beer tasting, were available.

Sunday afternoon, when I attended, the rain and clouds had abated typical West Texas fashion, and the sun beat down on participants, encouraging less time spent in direct rays and more spent in tents. My art observation limit lessened itself under the heat, but I was able to enjoy the view, visit artisans, and imbibe sweet wine.

One of the painters displayed scenes of Paris, which I didn’t recognize from the tower, but instead the white architecture and familiar streets. She shared that she had spent several years in France, which made me long for the Sienne and the happy vibe of the city. Another painter, depicting western scenes, lived in Oregon. I couldn’t discern the connection between cowboys and Oregon, but then again I’m not expert on the state. Perhaps he just liked western scenes.

The wine server offered me a chilled white version of Y’all, which she reported was fermented in Texas, locally. It was delicious, but I haven’t been able to find it online.

Despite the heat, the Museum, with its tenderly-cared grass and beautiful sculptures, provided an aesthetically-pleasing backdrop for other mediums to display. Perhaps a fountain would be nice, but otherwise it was lovely.

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