3 Ways to Manage and Profit from Facebook Reviews

Facebook reviews are now driving e-commerce. Customers are always looking for reviews and validation from fellow customers before completing the purchase or the desired action. Any business must be smart enough to manage the Facebook reviews, and shrewd enough to use the positive reviews to amplify business. Here Retaliate1st list their tactics on amplifying your positive Facebook reviews.

3 Ways to Profit from Facebook Reviews

  1. Facebook Comments Can Be Deleted

If you are receiving negative comments, you can either:

  • Respond to them (positively — fighting in your comments section will harm your reputation)
  • Delete them

The main advantage to getting a negative comment is that you can remove it and block the user. If it’s a legitimate bad review, you should respond.

If it’s a former employee, competitor, or just a whacko who loves to troll, then delete.

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  1. Reviews Can Not Be Deleted

Anything left in the actual review section of your Facebook cannot be deleted. This is done to protect the consumer, as every business would simply delete all non-positive reviews.

But, don’t fret, this is actually a good thing, especially if you have overwhelmingly positive reviews.

If you don’t, then ask your customers to review you on Facebook. Everyone and their mother (literally) has a Facebook account, so getting them to leave a review doesn’t take much action on their part. You should link them to your page to make it as easy as possible. Ethical bribes are ok in this situation, too.

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The more positives you have, the less impact the negatives hold.

What do you do when someone drops a 1-star review plus negative text?

Respond to the review. Publicly invite them to contact you. You don’t have to admit mistakes. A simple, “We’re sorry to hear you are having an issue. Please contact us at 888–888–8888 and we’ll help you.”

Why Facebook Reviews Are Critical

It’s simple, direct, doesn’t admit that you’ve done something wrong, and most importantly, it shows other customers that when there’s an issue, you jump on solving it. No matter how web-savvy we become, there is still a pervading fear of being ripped off online by a business that takes our credit card payment and skips town.

Responding with an invitation to contact helps quell these fears.
 What about if the negative review keeps on the offensive?

Continue to remain calm and invite them to resolve the issue with you. If they continue to push, they end up looking bad while you show yourself to be a trustworthy business that handles even the harshest of your critics with grace.

  1. Cultivate More Reviews

The best thing you can do is cultivate as many reviews as possible. As discussed above, link your page in email to your customers and ask for a review.

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Offer them a gift card, discount, free info, or something they’ll like in exchange for a review. Note: in exchange for a review, not a positive review. This is an important distinction with the FTC.

With most experts predicting that Facebook reviews will soon surpass Yelp as the go-to review site (Yelp’s bizarre strong-arm tactics are becoming well known to consumers, they were even parodied on South Park recently), now is a great time to start the review building process.