Fighting for the American Worker

The American worker makes our country go. And our unions are critical for standing up for worker’s rights and empowering the middle class.

They proudly represent women and men working in nearly every industry there is. They are in our communities, workplaces, and in our governments, fighting for better workplaces and better lives.

As I am at the DNC regional forum in Detroit, home of the automobile and the union women and men who make it, I can’t help but think of my great-grandfather, who risked his life so that Colorado coal miners could unionize and have their voices heard.

My grandfathers both followed in his footsteps as proud members of the United Mine Workers of America and my father spent twenty years in the wire mill and as a member of United Steelworkers, Local 2102 in my hometown of Pueblo, Colorado.

As an Associate Member of the United Steelworkers, I understand that we need policies that will protect the rights of workers to come together to demand better, equal wages and safer working conditions, and we need to fight to make sure that women are receiving equal pay and equal benefits for equal work.

Led by the man who buys Chinese steel, instead of ours, the fight from the right is getting stronger. Throughout the country, Republicans have been steadily rolling back workers’ rights through so-called right to work laws.

And Donald Trump has nominated Carl’s Jr. CEO Andy Puzder — who has a track record of being anti-worker — to head the Department of Labor, the department responsible for protecting and advocating for America’s workers.

So we can’t let up, and we must keep supporting our workers, who are fighting to make our country a better place.

It’s for the steelworker.
It’s for the field worker.
For the hotel maid.
And for the auto assembly line worker.
For the people who make our country go.

That’s who I will continue to fight for as the next DNC Vice Chair. And I hope you will join me in that fight.

Visit my website to see my vision for the DNC. www.RickPalacio.com/vision

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