Getting Shit Done
Michelle Child
31

I’m doing something kind of similar. Basically I decided that I need to increase my development skills, so I sectioned off one hour per day at the end of my working day, at work (usually the time when I’m least productive), to learn. This gives me a possible five hours per week — around 230 hours of learning per year.

The thought process was that if I do a bit everyday, it would become part of my routine and it’d be persistent. What do I mean by persistent? I tried to learn in weekly, two, three hour blocks, in the evening, at home but it just didn’t work for me. I found I got too tired in the last hour and a half and my overall attention span was not great. I’m finding this hour at the end of the working day is much better for me because it’s a short, incremental update to what I learned the previous day and because of that I’m seeing the following benefits:

  1. What I’m learning seems to be staying in my brain.
  2. I can’t wait to start my learning hour at the end of the day, a time, as I said before, where I wasn’t really getting much done previously.
  3. I’m finding that next day, I’m enthusiastic to see if I can incorporate or test some of the things I’ve learned from the previous learning session.

Of course, to do this I had to speak to my boss first but once I explained the reasons why this would benefit them as well as me, he got onboard with it.

One other thing, I’ve noticed that I’m happier in work, more enthusiastic about my work and happier in general, since I started doing this… imagine if every workplace did this…?

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