To Die a Better Life

Today, I am not writing about real estate crowd funding. Five years ago, I died to a better life. I was diagnosed with stage 3 melanoma cancer.

Today I couldn’t be happier, not because I haven’t died, but because I got to appreciate life without the fear of dying. Big difference.

I can’t help but wonder, if it hadn’t been for the cancer, if I would’ve ever been exposed to the transformative power of the plant medicines from the Shipibo people in The Peruvian Amazon.

Looking back, I am amazed on how much everything has changed in the world. Thankfully. As serious scientific research with psychedelics like ayahuasca, psilocybin and LSD goes mainstream, I am hopeful that one day I may know, if what happened to me in the jungle was a placebo effect caused by the visions, or in in fact I got biologically cured from the fear of dying.

I wish other people with terminal diseases (and their families) could see the illusion of death for what it is, to live better lives free of fear. This is why I fully support the work of scientists like Stephen Ross from NYU, Roland Griffiths from Johns Hopkins and David Nutt from the Imperial College of London, who with their studies are helping us understand, if “end of life anxiety” on cancer patients may be treated.

Evidence is showing that psychedelics stimulate the 2A receptor in serotonin in the brain with incredible therapeutic possibilities.

In a recent article published in the Guardian, Amanda Feilding, founder of Beckley and co-director of the trial programme with Nutt, said: “The results from our research are helping is to understand how psychedelics change consciousness, and how this information can be used to find breakthrough treatments for many of humanity’s most intractable psychiatric disorders, such as depression, addiction and obsessive compulsive disorder.”

We shall not forget that 98 percent of the population ever born, is already dead. And out of the 2 percent that remains alive, 100 percent will die. We all need to die to a better life.

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