A week is still a long time in politics…

Just one week after Jeremy Corbyn consolidated his place as leader of the Labour Party, the influence of a truly left-wing opposition is showing itself on the Tory party.

Instead of the usual gung-ho headline-grabbing first day of conference announcements, we have a relaxation of the onslaught against disabled people begun under Cameron’s administration. It’s only a little concession and doubtless still leaves many with the stress of unnecessary regular assessments, but it was accompanied this morning by a little strap line – we don’t want to be the nasty party.

Instead of the usual gung-ho headline-grabbing first day of conference announcements, we have a relaxation of the onslaught against disabled people begun under Cameron’s administration. It’s only a little concession and doubtless still leaves many with the stress of unnecessary regular assessments, but it was accompanied this morning by a little strap line – we don’t want to be the nasty party.

It probably wouldn’t have happened under Cameron, but does it prove that Maggie-May is a kinder politician? I don’t think so. She is a Tory after all, and so far channelling Margaret Thatcher as much as possible, hence my nickname. But obviously someone in the Tory press machine is sniffing the wind and asking themselves whether unadulterated greed and vilifying the least fortunate in society are the best ways to woo voters. Maybe not, they think, look how many people voted for Corbyn.

It’s good that this has happened. We need the extreme right-wind to self censor it’s worst elements. But we also need to be clear that Torism, with its support for austerity and big business, is still vile in tooth and claw. As the debate moves on, it’s even more important to establish the clear blue water between Labour and the government.

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