What’s your brand?

Image by Sam Ainsworth

“What’s your brand? It’s the promise that you make implicitly or explicitly. What do I expect from you when I hire you? What do I expect when you show up in my headphones? What do I expect when we engage?

What’s the promise? Brands that keep their promises are consistent, brands that keep their promises are in trust. You have a brand whether you want one or not. From the minute you engage with you boss or coworker or prospect or customer or even the Avis rent-a-car counter, you have a brand. You’re branded as the impatient customer who’s not listening, or the calm professional who gets the job done, or the short term hustler who’s always looking for an angle.

So yes you have a brand. When should you start working on it? Yesterday, or a year ago, or five years ago. If it’s too late for that then the next best time is right now. Your brand is a story and it’s a story that helps people tell themselves about you. So your appearance, your handshake, your pricing, how long it takes you to deliver the goods, where you’re located, your accent, how tall you are, even the way you spell your name, are all parts of the story that other people tell themselves about you. And most of those stories are unfair. Most of those stories are based on prejudice, and a lack of information, and fear, and fear, and fear.

The stories people tell themselves about you are never true. They can’t be, no one knows you as well as you do. I’ve given a thousand speeches, no one has heard all of them except for me. I’ve written 19 best sellers, most of you haven’t read all of them. I’ve written 6,000 blog posts. Again, and again, and again. You go down the list. So many things we don’t know about you. So many things we don’t know about what you’re capable of, what you dream of, what you want to produce.

So yes, you have a brand, and no, it’s not the same for everyone. But it’s up to you to consistently and persistently show up in a way that amplifies that brand.”

Seth Godin on the Tim Ferriss Show

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