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Quotes are great.

Think momentarily about what a quote really is. Somebody piecing together words in such an eloquent and truthful fashion, the reader is affected enough to remember them in full, or share them with others, or engrave them upon their epitaph.

Highlight and collect quotes because they are valuable tools in communicating difficult to explain ideas and beliefs that you share with its’ writers. You naturally know when it’s time to break out the highlighter; you’re reading along and come upon a sentence or two that teaches you something that you already knew but couldn’t phrase. …


Ever heard of Malcolm Gladwell’s 10,000 hours principal?

If not, it states that 10,000 hours of practice is a requirement to master any skill.

Bullshit. It doesn’t take 417 uninterrupted days to learn. This is 2017, nobody has that kind of time, 10,000 hours is a myth.

Today’s student learns by doing, adjusting on the fly, failing more often than succeeding. Failure is the great educator, and it’s not the sore winner it’s made out to be. By expecting success, but preparing for failure, you aren’t actually failing, you’re experimenting. Falling short of your goals? Perhaps. But coming away empty handed? …


The place you once called home has a whole new feel when it’s all blank walls and packed boxes. Between college and NYC rent hikes, moving is no foreign affair. What’s new is where I’m moving, nowhere.

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Today is the first day of the rest of my life. Looking back, I’ll either chuckle at how ignorant I was or be thankful that I finally took the chance. I’ve been obsessed with being a ‘digital nomad’ for years now. The Four Hour Work Week gave me the definition and App Academy gave me the path to get there. …


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Socrates is credited with the quote, “I know one thing; that I know nothing”.

What is an engineer exactly? According to the all-mighty Google, an engineer is “a skillful contriver or originator of something,” but that doesn’t really capture the essence of the job. To me, an engineer is a converter of ideas into reality, one who takes a blueprint and turns it into a building, hears a pitch and builds an app, takes a problem and solves it. There have always been engineers because there have always been problems and there will always be engineers because there will always be problems.

When approaching a new problem like transitioning to freelance, it’s natural to preliminarily look at the issue from a one thousand foot view. While it’s important to grasp the whole of the problem, in zooming out, you miss the “unknown unknowns” in the way. These are the problems that eventually need solving, but can’t be planned for since they aren’t technically problems yet. …


I’m already exhausted.

Nobody told me how much work quitting would be.

One imagines their last few weeks at work as stressless. Coast through the day, keep your head down, do some knowledge transfer, work a little less hard and say goodbye. Yet, I find myself swamped. Coworkers that want to hear my life plans, old code that’s all of the sudden unfit for production, integrations needing some sort of touchup and a thousand other last minute emergencies lead to work feeling just as rushed as it was before I told them we had no future together.

Exhaustingly, post-employment life preparation is a full-time job unto itself.

The minutiae of finalizing the short-term rentals of my West Village studio alone tolls considerable stress. Considering how and when to move stuff out, duplicating keys, deciding if I need an apartment caretaker, finding that caretaker, deciding what that caretaker actually does, managing payment, booking cleaning services, and most importantly generating leads for the unbooked few months to come all take more time and effort than I initially planned for. …


Maybe you have ideas. You have skills. You’ve never had a problem getting jobs. People seem to like you. You solve people’s problems. You’re young. You’re untethered. You notice trends. You get shit done. You trust yourself.

Do you think that’s going to last forever? Don’t skills become stale? Don’t job markets shift? Don’t people find excuses to stay?

If you find yourself able to potentially put a dent in the universe, you’re doing the universe and worse, yourself a disservice if you don’t take that shot.

I’m taking that shot.

I told my boss the other day that I’m quitting. He made a face, but it wasn’t shock. He looked 60% understanding, 25% excited, and 15% worried. I’ve been thinking a lot about how poor of a job human language does of describing feelings, but if I must use it, I’d say he was knowingly concerned. …


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If you’re like me, you’ve spent your last few cycles building various slack integrations for your company’s internal going-ons. You probably have a better grasp of what’s considered ‘High Priority’ and what’s considered ‘Clearly a hobby’, so on second thought, you’re not like me.

What’s addictive about the Slackbot building space is that nobody realized it was a space until very recently, and now it’s a bit of a gold rush. The de-facto tool for building chat apps is still Botkit, but very recently, Beep Boop has stepped their game up and given the world a new framework to build bots and (FINALLY) a clean way for developers to test their bots before shipping them off to run in production. …

About

Sam Feder

Once a loyal employee, now a nomad freelancer. Learning what it is to swap my employee id, NYC and my studio for clients, flights and hostels. samfeder.co

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