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The Covid-19 outbreak has impacted the behaviour of investors and consumers around the world, causing brands everywhere to rethink their marketing strategies. What piqued investor interest a couple of months ago may not yield the same effect today.

However, amidst Covid-19 global headlines, investors haven’t stopped thinking about growth opportunities, they’re just thinking about them differently.

This guide provides a few key tips on how to market your fundraise during challenging times — whatever they may be — to help you secure the funding you need, and acquire customers along the way.

Think long term

If you’ve ever bought anything online, you’ve likely received emails from businesses advising users on their policy updates. While it’s important to communicate that you’ve implemented hygiene practices and remote working policies, an investor will be thinking longer term. …


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March was a challenging month for businesses around the world, as we adjust to an unprecedented and challenging environment. In times of difficulty and uncertainty, we feel it’s important to highlight the achievements of our portfolio companies, whether this be commercially or in helping the wider community.

Mailchimp acquires Courier

Mailchimp has acquired Courier, the British magazine that focuses on educating entrepreneurs and small businesses. Terms of the deal were not disclosed but the deal will help Mailchimp expand internationally.


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What if we told you that the secret ingredient behind nearly every successful Seedrs raise is a list?

For the 1,000+ deals that have funded on Seedrs, there are typically three stages to achieving your fundraising target:

Validation

The first step to get under your belt when planning an equity crowdfunding campaign is to think about how you can validate your proposition so it’s perceived as concrete by others. A way to help with this is to put together an investment deck (template here) and seek the advice of any experienced contacts in your circle of contacts.

Getting feedback will prove absolutely essential in securing some initial funds in your campaign, which is incredibly important when crowdfunding. Nobody wants to publicly launch at 0% so you want to relay some security in the form of some anchor investment. …


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A key question we have had from many founders and CEOs is if this is a good time to be raising capital?

TL;DR: Yes.

Over the last few weeks, we have shared a lot of content and resources with our community about the pros and cons of fundraising in this environment. In addition to this, we thought it would be helpful to also provide some insight and data on how investment activity on the Seedrs platform has behaved since the beginning of the Covid-19 crisis.

As you can imagine, we have been watching this closely. The general picture is an encouraging one: after an initial dip, all key metrics have recovered to or are now exceeding our usual averages. Below, we’ve outlined some of the key shifts we’ve seen, and our analysis of it. …


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Over the past few weeks, we’ve been getting a lot of questions about how Seedrs works with convertible equity fundraises, also known as Advance Subscription Agreements (ASAs). Whilst this is something we’ve been doing for a few years, we thought it would be helpful to talk through how they work, and how they might benefit you, given the current climate.

On the Seedrs Academy blog, you can download the Seedrs ASA term sheet, so you can get familiar with the format and language. There’s also a glossary at the end of this post for some of the key terms used.

What is an ASA

An ASA in its simplest form is an investment for equity, but with the shares priced and issued at a later date. …


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There are many opinions on what constitutes a minimum viable product (MVP), from thought-provoking philosophical discussions that examine the nature of ‘minimal’ and ‘viable’ to those that give you a step-by-step breakdown of specific requirements. However, these tend to be based on specific experiences. There is nothing inherently wrong with this approach, what works for one person is great, and it might work for someone else. That being said, every company’s situation is different, and therefore specific strategies might not work universally. …


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Since the lockdown began, many businesses have had to make a shift to remote working and become familiar with new methods of digital communication. For the foreseeable future, every aspect of most business’ operations will be conducted online — including pitching.

Tech Nation’s Rising Stars pitching competition has given countless entrepreneurs the opportunity to take the floor to tell their stories, connect with the room and grow their confidence through constructive feedback.

We’ve teamed up with Rising Stars pitch coaches Billy Webber and Jill McKinney from Sunderland Software City to create this comprehensive guide to help you navigate virtual pitching, and feel confident delivering your message on-screen. …


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The recent coronavirus pandemic has highlighted the need for all businesses, from large corporates to early stage startups, to carry out impact assessments to anticipate and mitigate the effects of worst case scenarios.

Why Are Business Impact Assessments Important?

Business impact assessments enable you to produce well designed action plans that can help your business react quickly and effectively in a crisis, which can minimise the extent of any negative impact arising out of a crisis.

Additionally, a thorough impact assessment will help to alleviate investor concerns around continuity, which can be especially relevant in times of heightened caution and scrutiny.

In this article, we look at how to carry out a business impact assessment, the key impacts that early stage businesses should consider, and how to put together a business continuity plan. …


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Equity Calculator: How do I start?

For any founder raising investment, one of the questions usually top of mind is how much equity you’ll have to give up to get the cash you need. As a founder, you’ll likely want to hold on to as much of your company as possible, but the extent to which you can do so is necessarily dependent on the two other factors in the fundraising equation: how much you want to raise, and your valuation. The equation looks like this:

Investment Amount / Valuation = % Equity Offered

So, if your company is valued at £1M, and you want to raise £200K, you’ll need to offer 20% equity in your business. If you want to give up less equity, you’ll need to reduce the amount of investment needed, or increase your valuation. …


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A key part of any fundraise is investor Q&A. Whilst a pitch deck provides the general topline narrative, investors will invariably need to dig into more detail on your business, and getting your responses right is important. When you’re crowdfunding, this is no different; replying to investors’ questions and managing the campaign discussion board is crucial to running a successful campaign.

So, what sort of questions can you expect? To help, we’ve done a little analysis on what are the most common questions we see asked, and here are the results.

A quick note on the methodology: to create this blog we analysed the topic titles from the campaign discussion boards to find the most commonly occurring words and phrases. Due to the way investors phrase their questions, often with specificity to certain businesses/products, the number of questions reported in any given topic below are likely to be lower than the actual. For example, if an investor referenced specific competitors of a business in the question title, rather than the word ‘competitor’, this would not be included in the ‘competitor’ grouping.

About

Seedrs

Invest in businesses you believe in. Seedrs is authorised and regulated by the FCA. Remember that when investing, your capital is at risk.

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