How My Goalie Exorcised Her Hockey Fundraising Demons

Let there be light, love and a lot of cash.

Let there be light, love and a lot of cash.[/caption]

Fundraising is a necessary evil in the world of youth sports, and hockey is no different. Every year teams rack their brains to find the next great idea that will bring joy, peace of mind and of course money to their team account. Poker nights, raffles, swag sales…we’ve seen a few come and a few go. Although I have to say the best fundraising idea comes from the hockey mom Astra Groskaufmanis. Check out her book Offside By A Mile for details on what I call the 50 Shades of Fundraising theme…ahem. However, no matter what type of hockey fundraising you do, some love it, some loathe it and some just try to avoid it.

We have a history of trying to avoid it. Operative word, trying.

No one really gets out of it but my goalie has dug her heels (or shall I shall I say skates) in EVERY SINGLE TIME. Made worse by the fact that our association, in an effort to teach the girls responsibility, wants them to be 100% accountable which means no parent involvement. Admirable goal in theory but hey let’s face it, who hasn’t been out there at the eleventh hour waving that packet, poker ticket or team swag in people’s faces?

Hello my name is Puckgal and my goalie is a deadbeat fundraiser.

Here’s a typical conversation in our household about this year’s raffle ticket sales:

PG: Have you sold any of the raffle tickets?
McK: Mom, they are $20! Nobody I know has $20 for a raffle ticket.
PG: That is not true, you know plenty of people who have $20.
McK: But they don’t GET anything for it. They MIGHT win but they probably won’t. It’s not worth it to them.
PG: Don’t make assumptions..and it’s not about winning it’s about supporting your team, focus on that!
Mck: (glaring) Okay, okay.

And so it goes. Halfhearted efforts that usually lead my husband and I out to troll our workplaces and beg out-of-state relatives until we get the money. Usually at that eleventh hour with fear coursing in our veins that the association might boot her from the team. The phrase it takes a village doesn’t apply here…the villagers have lit torches and are looking for cash.

I vowed this year would be different. Relentless, I have been asking her everyday and even working on specific pitches for different types of clientele (can you tell I used to be sales?) Finally, we came up with a pitch that would put those homeless pet charities to shame. Damn you Sarah McLachlan and your sad music to all those sad puppy and kitten eyes!

She practiced what she would say and we hit a rink that was outside our normal area that was teeming with parents we didn’t know. Armed with her fundraising packet and wearing her hockey warm up jacket, I blessed her forehead with a kiss and she bravely hit the stands. About an hour later she returned.

McK: I got 2! I got 2! And they didn’t even care about what they were winning, I asked them to support the team and they just gave me their money!
PG: See? It never hurts to ask and it paid off.
McK: I don’t know why I was so worried…

Goalies. Always in their heads.

We are down to 7 left to sell and with over a week left, I am hoping the demons have been properly exorcised. Maybe then we will have a chance in hell to get our packet in on time. I sure would hate to have the other parents chase us down with lit torches!

Wanna buy a raffle ticket?

Update: We suck at fundraising. The villagers were restless and now the goalie has to pay me back. Next year I am writing a check from the get-go!

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