Use the ‘simplicity’ consumer behavior tip to influence others.

In one of my previous posts, I mentioned the power of simplicity, and how it can boost your business.

Read 3 Reasons simplicity will boost your business

In fact, it can boost way more than your business. It can help you in every aspect of your life.

Simplicity, especially, when applied in your communication, whether it’s spoken or written, makes others understand you.

When consumers understand what you are trying to say, you are able to influence their thoughts, emotions and ultimately their behavior. If they don’t understand you, then just forget about it.

“Write to the chimpanzee brain. Simply. Directly.” — Eugene Schwartz

… And while it’s always great to know what influences consumer behavior, if you don’t know how to do it, you might as well be as good as those who don’t know anything about the subject. …

Consumer behavior varies from one culture to another — both offline and online.

Learning about different cultures is usually associated with travel, but also, the more you interact with people from different cultures, regardless of whether you have actually visited their country, the more exposure you get.

People introduce you to their culture.

Culture is the study of social behavior and norms.

Culture is not just a different language. It’s not just about the location on the map or the music they like to listen to. It’s not just about whether they prefer to have tea or coffee in the morning.

When I started to interact with different people from different backgrounds, I started to learn how the different hand gestures could be interpreted as rude or friendly, depending on who you are talking to. Small gestures ranging from where you look, how you sit, or how loud you speak can make a huge difference in your interaction with someone from another culture. …

Whether it’s an event, a workshop or a training session, having no shows is a challenge to many entrepreneurs, event organizers, and trainers.

They put in the effort. They carefully craft the messaging for their advertised content. They write implicit descriptions. They educate their customers. They even confirm their attendance on the phone, and still, a big percentage of those customers wouldn’t show up. They wouldn’t show up. They wouldn’t even send a message apologizing for not coming.

Those event organizers get frustrated, they get disappointed… and then ask themselves…

How can I make my customers commit?

I have some good news… and an answer to that question, of course using the principles of those consumer behavior studies that I am in love with. …

Let’s talk a little bit about customer service.

While it’s a very well-known trend to companies and service providers that now is the era on which they compete on customer experience, some of them still go out of their way to disappoint us, customers.

I wouldn’t say that this is the company’s strategy per se, but it’s more about the customer service agent that you end up dealing with.

I don’t know about you, but I personally like to avoid interactions with customer service as much as I can… and if I absolutely have to do it, I opt for the e-mail, online chat, etc. I don’t want to do the phone conversation. Maybe it’s because I am a millennial. Maybe not. It’ doesn’t matter. What matters is that the mere thought of having to repeat my story more than once turns me off. …

Giving away free ‘bonuses’ could backfire.

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote a blog post, 4 Words that will bring your sales to the next level. One of the words was the word “bonus”, which personally drives me insane. However, now, that I know about it, it might not work that well on me… or maybe not? I am not too sure about that.

In my post, I promised, that if I learn anything scientific about the word ‘bonus’, I would share it. …

Stories. Aren’t they incredible?

A story — you live in it, empathize with it and sometimes relate if it rings a bell.

Today, I am not going to talk about fictional stories, but rather stories told in a business context — or for that matter, one of my very own stories.

About five years ago I made a career shift from what we, consultants, call “industry” into management consulting. Consulting was my dream job and when I had an opportunity to jump in it, I took it and dived right into it. Consulting was my dream job for one simple reason:

You will constantly surprise yourself with what you are capable of.

Carol S. Dweck mentioned one of my very favorite quotes by Alfred Binet in her book mindset. …

It seems like in every ‘business’ discussion, there is no escape to mentioning the emergence of technology and how it is currently changing the customer experience, let alone the future experience.

While I personally love technology and how it enabled me as a consumer, especially when it comes to saving my time, I still believe in the importance of the human factor.

I love it when I complete all the services online, and God only knows how much I hate calling customer service. I love it when I buy heavy items online but hate it when I can’t return them.

I also love it when I interact with a friendly face, let’s say when buying coffee. …

Some words trigger you — they excite you to the extent that you want to spend, right now, eagerly, whatever is in your pocket, or your credit card.

In his book, Brainfluence, Roger Dooley, mentions the magical power of some words on our brain. I could also say I recently discovered one word that works like magic. Read on to find out.

1. New

Say the word ‘New’ and you will get people interested to figure out what you are bringing to the table.

“Researcher Bianca Wittmann and her teams had subjects choose cards associated with small rewards while scanning their brains using fMRI. Over time, the subjects were shown cards with which they had become familiar as well as new ones. The researchers found that making novel choices lit up the brain’s ventral striatum, an evolutionarily primitive part of the brain and an area associated with rewarding behavior. Wittmann speculates that dopamine, a neurotransmitter that is part of the brain’s reward process, is released when a novel choice is made.” …

Do you think smiling could make you less professional?

I have encountered people who think smiling may impact the way others will perceive you, and not in a good way — in a professional setting, as in a work environment. You might not seem serious, they think.

To tell you the truth, when I heard this, I was astonished to learn that some people may consider smiling could hurt your professionalism.

So here I am.

In the classic, “How to win friends and influence people” by Dale Carnegie, Carnegie had a whole chapter dedicated to “Smile”.

A smile is definitely a good thing, but here is the thing. When done properly, it would maximize its impact — in that professional setting. …

When you look at yourself, what do you see?

Remember earlier when I was brainstorming with my friend who is testing a new stylish laptop bag for corporate women?

If not, it’s ok. I get it, you are busy, but in case you are interested here is the blog post: I am not sure this is for you, but…

A little background context.

I was brainstorming ideas with my friend who is doing customer testing for a new stylish laptop bag for corporate women.

In addition to the “I am not sure this is for you, but…” tip, I also suggested to get a mirror, where customers can see themselves wearing the bag. I didn’t write about it in that blog post though, because, well, my friend was too lazy to get the mirror due to logistic reasons… and I have no results to share with you. …

About

Sherwette Mansour

Management consultant. Abstract artist. Interested in psychology and consumer behavior… Food, travel, photography, water sports... Spontaneous otherwise.

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