A cover image for the post indicates how to organise data
A cover image for the post indicates how to organise data
Design with data

We all know that it is always better to make our design decisions based on data. It is one of the most important approaches when designing digital products. To learn how the users use the product, what are their pain points, and what are the drop off points, to improve the product and the overall experience.

One designer, a lot of data

Why do we collect data?

There are several reasons why to base the design on data, mainly to be able to answer these questions:

  1. Friction points: Where are users getting stuck? Where do we have broken flows? What value is lost? What are the desired flows we want users to do? …


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Cues in product design

We live in a world full of cues. In almost everyday routine, we see or feel them and they change the way we react and behave.

Think about your routine morning, how many actions do you do every morning? Quite a lot, right? When do you decide to finish one and to start another? The alarm clock rings, this is your cue to wake up (or snooze it). You see the sunlight through the curtain, this is the first cue indicates the morning is here. When the morning coffee ends, this is a cue to go and get dressed. When we eat the morning breakfast, our body sends a cue when it is enough, and probably this is the time to organize the dishes. …


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In the last past years, a lot of digital products have changed the way we navigate and browsing online products. When we think about this and the reasons behind it, we could find some great user experience principles.

Brief history

The horizontal navigation in interfaces designed first in 1995 for websites, where the navigation and clickable links appeared on top of the screen. The screens in 1995 where almost squared with a ratio of 4:3. Just to compare today the ratio of the screen is 16:9, meaning wider.


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In the past two years, I’ve got several questions regarding the UX and product designer role. I offer some advice to people who approached me, who want to switch their role to be UX designers, some of them just started in this role.

The designer is therefore the artist of today, not because he is a genius but because he works in such a way as to re-establish contact between art and the public, because he has the humility and ability to respond to whatever demand is made of him by the society in which he lives, because he knows his job, and the ways and means of solving each problem of design. And finally because he responds to the human needs of his time, and helps people to solve certain problems. …


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I have heard from some designers in the industry, several of them worked with me in the same team, that having a good design is about making it clear to use and easy to navigate. Which is true. But there is so much behind it.

I had the chance to talk with designers during interviews conducted for open positions, and I found that a lot of them, do not know to explain the decisions they took in their designs appear in their portfolio, with a simple language. When the question is “Why have you decided to implement this feature this way?” I have heard a lot “I based on a gut feeling”. …


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Have you ever considered how your product feels like for new users, in the first 5 seconds after they have finished sign in? I collected here some examples and insights. If you are working on improving the user activation (and surprisingly retention), take several minutes to grab some great insights here.

Albert Einstein reportedly said that if he had an hour to solve a problem, he would spend fifty-five minutes thinking about the problem and five minutes thinking about solutions.
Ask for More / Alexandra Carter

What is a first-time user experience (FTUE)?

It is the impression users get in the first 5 seconds in the product right after they have finished the registration flow. Of course, 5 seconds is not enough time to see the whole product or to interact with it, the main focus will be always on the main initial page of the product. …


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By reading content relevant to your professional, even if it is not directly what you are doing in your daily tasks, it increases creativity, and open the mind to new ideas.

This read is a collection of the insights I have collected in the last year. I hope it will be inspiring to you too.

Books


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I am thrilled to share with you here the most untalked aspect of design which affects any user who has been using your product. An optimism that leads to positiveness.

Design trends are always changing, every new year we see some reads about the new trends of the year and some predictions about what will happen next year. When it comes to product design, most of the time, the main principles were given by Google’s Material Design and Apple’s Human Interface guidelines.

When we talk about changing design trends and user experiences, there is one element that has not been communicated or taken into consideration: optimism by design. This is the time to talk about components and behaviors and how they affect users’ feelings, especially by conveying optimism to users. …


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We are in an age of impatient, we want everything right away when we interact with digital websites and products.

I am sure you had a situation when you googled something, and you could not find the answer in the first results shown. Not to mention scrolling through the first page, and ho no, not even on the next second page. What an awful experience, that makes each one of us, feeling tingling at our fingertips, scrolling up nervously to refine our query.

If Google was a guy video

About

Shiran Hirshberg

I am passionate about UX design and my work is all about making end-users happy. Take a look on my portfolio: https://sheshiran.webflow.io/

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