Making It in Hollywood: Are you looking for a job, or looking for work?

I get many inquiries about how to get a job in Hollywood. These usually involve questions about how to get an agent, how to get an audition, how to get someone to read a script… The goal in these cases is to get a paying gig, make a sale, or recruit someone to devote their time (without pay) to launching and advancing a career. When asked, I usually find that the individual making the inquiry is not working in their area of creative interest, or in any area of creative endeavor.

After so many years, this still surprises me. There are thousands of independent films made every year, thousands of film school projects, 10’s of thousands of ideas that people would like to bring to fruition, thousands of plays at local and community theaters, and who knows how many projects intended for digital and online distribution. There’s not a single project that couldn’t use another pair of hands to help out. There are countless ways to work, gain experience, expand one’s network of professional relationships, find new creative partners, and graduate to mainstream paying jobs.

The son of a friend of mine is an aspiring screenwriter. He volunteered to work in the LA public school system in a special program that teaches kids how to write plays…and then SAG actors come in and produce the kids’ work. In the program he met another volunteer…the woman who just became his wife. The two of them wrote a screenplay together, which became a finalist in a prestigious screenwriting competition. That screenplay and the competition has opened the door to meetings with interested agents.

There is no difficulty finding work, even if finding jobs is competitive and elusive. There are a couple of good sites that exist for the purpose of helping creatives find each other in order to help stimulate opportunities for working together. Check out ShowBizCentral.com or Stage32.com.

Are you working in entertainment, or just spending your time looking for a job?

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Marc Pariser is Founder and CEO of ShowBizCentral. He has been a packaging agent representing writers, directors, producers, comedians, production companies and executives at the world’s leading agencies, including the William Morris Agency and Creative Artists Agency.

If you’ve got a question about your career visit marcpariser.com.


Originally published at www.motionpictureprofessionals.com on October 20, 2015.

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