The Poor leadership of the Church of England

It is surely a sad day (autumn 2015) when the current Archbishop of Canterbury is reported to have made a statement that he has occasional doubts about Christianity whilst at the same time making critical political comments regarding the elected governments commitment to getting the country’s economy in good order in order to afford the means of looking after those who need assistance from the State.

Added to this is the reported fact that another Bishop is supporting the news that Christian prayers in assemblies at schools are to be curtailed in order that other faiths should not be offended. This latter begs the question, “What about the possible offensive effect this decision might have on those of us who are Christians?”

One is left with the thoughts that these appointments to the Christian Church of England are both demonstrations of ‘taking money (income) under false pretences and not being suitable candidates for the offices they hold. Surely such appointments should be made by giving consideration to the Christian beliefs held and leadership abilities rather than apparent political appointments.

Our country has a culture built by trial and error over the centuries and firmly based upon the Christian religion. I am certain that many members of their flocks that they are paid to lead could teach them how to prove the truths of the Supreme Deity — God and His constant and individual presence — the truth of which they experience every day of their lives.