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I am an author of books, a taker of photographs, and a creator of tasty things to eat.

I’m so pleased that you have made it to my small island in the great ocean that is the Internet. However you made it here–perhaps because you read a book or article that I wrote, saw something that I edited, collated, or created, or spotted one of my photographs–welcome!

Once upon a time I taught history in a secondary school but now I am a writer, editor, and photographer. I also help people to create websites. From photography books to meatloaf recipes via fundraising websites, if it involves words or pictures, I can get involved.

If you would like to…


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Between the ages of two and five, I lived with my parents in a maisonette close to the racecourse in Krefeld, a small industrial town in north western Germany. A Jack Russell called Lummell lived in the back garden–he was my best friend–my mother and I used to go to Hortons for breakfast every Wednesday, and I would spend my days playing in the spielplatzen with the children of the other jockeys at West Germany’s racecourses.

Yes, that’s right. West Germany. This was the early 1980s and the Berlin Wall was still physically dividing homes, families, and a city, and…


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Josh and I have stayed at three different hotels over our ten day trip to Israel. Reaching two of them has proved to be a testing experience for our perambulatory stamina.

Let’s start the recantation of our tales of suitcase dragging in Jerusalem, on none other than Yom Yerushalayim. That’s Jerusalem Day to those not initiated into the cult of pig-reviling, candle-lighting Judaism. So that’s a day that shuts down huge tracts of the city in order to celebrate it and marvel at its wonders. It’s a super festival if you’re a Jerusalem resident who likes parades and singing songs…


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Ehm… Daniela, I think that this is the end of the line.

Yes, it was indeed the end of the 30 bus route and instead of taking us to the Israel Museum, Josh and I had wound up at Kibbutz Ramat Rachel. Not that there’s anything wrong with Ramat Rachel per se, and given that one of the major works that Josh is exploring in his Master’s thesis is Naftali Bezem’s the The Defence of Ramat Rachel, to say that we’ve been there–if only to alight one bus and board another in the return direction–is rather gratifying. …


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On Sunday morning I found myself throwing a random collection of belongings into a bag and driving for six hours across the country because someone I love needed me. It wasn’t exactly on how I had planned on spending my Sunday, but something unexpectedly lovely came out of the tension and the worry. On the return trip, after establishing that the person I love most in the world hadn’t inflicted terrible damage on himself and he’d be fine in a few days’ time, my father and I made the trip over the causeway to Holy Island. It was a glorious…


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Just before I left for Thailand I was offered the opportunity to review a camera bag for a large retail site. I took an age to decide which bag would simultaneously be of most use to me as a workhorse for my trip and as a review model for Photocritic’s readers. My deliberations led me to a Crumpler Jackpack and I dropped a note back to the retail site saying that if they could get me one before I flew, that would be super. …


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From the western Thai town of Mae Sot it’s possible to cross the Thai-Myanmar Friendship Bridge and make your way into the Burmese town of Myawaddy. The border here has been open more-or-less permanently since summer 2013, and while it bustles with Burmese workers, it’s not a crossing made by a huge number of Farangs, or Westerners (literally ‘guavas’), unless they work for NGOs. It is, however, becoming more a popular route with people completing visa runs. And there are the occasional people like me, who decide to visit for the day because they can.

For anyone wielding a passport…


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The hotel where I stayed in Bangkok was 300 metres from the Rama I street protest site to the left, and 500 metres from the Lumphini Park protest site to the left. I spent quite some time wandering the sites, which were friendly, welcoming, and very well-organised. Most of the protestors were more than happy to be photographed, and that included children. I was happy to photograph them.


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I arrived in Bangkok five days before the Thais were due to go to the polls in a general election. However, amid growing discontent and dissatisfaction with Yingluck Shinawatra’s government, many people had taken to the streets to protest. Rather than face a ballot sheet comprising the names of Thaksin cronies and shills, they wanted reform first.

Daniela Bowker

Author of books; taker of photos; baker of cakes. Previously disillusioned secondary school teacher, now a freelance writer and editor.

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