EACH TUESDAY AT NOON, HEIDI ELMORE MAKES HER WAY ACROSS CAMPUS TO STANFORD HOSPITAL, WHERE SHE SPENDS THE NEXT HOUR TEACHING PATIENTS AND THEIR CAREGIVERS HOW TO KNIT AND CROCHET. AN EXPERIENCED FIBER ARTIST, ELMORE BELONGS TO A COMMUNITY OF STAFF MEMBERS WHOSE EXTRACURRICULAR EXPLOITS AND PASSIONS INFORM-AND ENHANCE-THEIR IDENTITIES ON AND OFF-CAMPUS.

A Single Thread


They begin their shifts under cover of darkness, slipping through the hospital’s doors just as others are getting ready to head home. They do the work of several-often overseeing as many as 30 patients at a time. They’re specialists and generalists wrapped into one, able to shift identities in the blink of an eye. And you never quite know where they’ll turn up: at the bedside, assessing the condition of a heart transplant recipient; in the hallway, advising a resident on treatment plans; seated in the lobby, calming the family of a recently admitted patient.

They aren’t superheroes of the…


We know that slightly more than half of medical students in the United States are women, as are about half of internal medicine residents. But, as assistant professor of cardiovascular medicine Fatima Rodriguez, MD, MPH, says, “Something happens at the critical transition when people are deciding what specialty fellowship to do.”

Joshua Knowles, MD, PhD, assistant professor of cardiovascular medicine, who directs the general cardiology fellowship program, knows what those numbers look like at Stanford. “Over the last few years, of 450 applications for fellowship we’ve received per year in cardiology, only 20% to 25% have been women,” he says…


ONE THING THAT RONALD WITTELES, MD, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CARDIOVASCULAR MEDICINE, ENJOYS DOING WHEN HE PARTICIPATES IN AN EXCHANGE WITH ANOTHER RESIDENCY PROGRAM IS JOINING MORNING ROUNDS ON THE CARDIAC CARE UNIT (CCU).

As the residency director for the Department of Medicine, he is interested in noting differences between what Stanford residents do on rounds and what residents at other institutions do. As he is a cardiologist, a CCU is familiar territory.

Visiting Yale not long ago, he showed up at the CCU early one morning, unannounced, and walked down a hall to join a group of residents huddled around…


Making inclusion work, particularly at the institutional level, is the challenge, speakers asserted.

Hannah Valantine spoke Jan. 29 during the Department of Medicine’s first diversity and inclusion week.

“Great minds think differently.” If there was a unifying idea expressed by speakers at the Department of Medicine’s first diversity and inclusion week, it was probably that.

Hannah Valantine, MD, of the National Institutes of Health, said it first, when she opened the Jan. 29 sessions with her grand rounds presentation. Sonia Aranza, a global diversity and inclusion strategist, echoed these words when she spoke on multigenerational diversity later that day.

Both women, along with various other speakers, sought to challenge conventional wisdom about diversity, including the…


Clinical associate professor of endocrinology Marina Basina, MD, has been caring for patients with Type 1 diabetes since she completed her fellowship and joined the Stanford faculty in 2003. She heads the inpatient diabetes service and has chaired the diabetes task force since 2009. Not only is she a beloved and highly regarded expert in diabetes and glucose control, but she also is an award-winning educator.

Basina has well-recognized and truly extraordinary teaching skills. After her first year on faculty, she won the 2004 House Staff Award for Demonstrating Excellence in Clinical Teaching. She was awarded her division’s Fellows Teaching…


Now that computers can be taught to process large amounts of data and to recognize patterns in them, their usefulness in medicine is greatly enhanced.

In the hands of Olivier Gevaert, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical informatics, patients with a variety of diseases including cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, and cardiovascular diseases are being helped without even knowing it, thanks to artificial intelligence.

Gevaert fuses data from disparate sources to create algorithms to guide clinicians making diagnoses, prognoses, and treatment decisions. …


“Everyone should have equitable access to timely, high-quality cancer care,” says Manali Patel in a new ASCO statement.

Back in 2015 when Manali Patel, MD, MPH, MS (assistant professor of oncology), accepted a position on the Cancer Disparities Committee (now the Health Equity Committee) of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), she may not have guessed that she’d finish that service six years later with three huge accomplishments.

The first accomplishment was spending three years as a committee rank and file member and three years as chair-elect, chair, and past chair of the committee. The second accomplishment was having two children. And the third was her leadership role in drafting a policy statement on cancer disparities and…


APPLYING MACHINE LEARNING ALGORITHMS TO PATIENT DATA IS HELPING STANFORD RESEARCHERS BETTER DIAGNOSE AND TREAT LUNG DISEASE.

Parts of medicine can be trial and error-if one drug doesn’t work, try another; if a diagnosis isn’t leading to a cure, maybe the diagnosis is wrong. But eliminating that trial and error, through more informed diagnostic tests, saves time for both clinicians and patients. In the division of pulmonary, allergy and critical care medicine, machine learning algorithms are now guiding those more personalized treatment decisions.

“We’re at a critical juncture in pulmonary medicine, where innovative analysis approaches are needed to handle the…


An investigation into increased rates of kidney disease in the agricultural communities of California’s Central Valley.

A community partnership aimed at enhancing access for hypertension screening and treatment among African Americans in Santa Clara County.

Those are just two of the four projects that will receive the Department of Medicine’s 2020 Diversity Chair Investigator Awards, a new initiative focused on diversity, equity, inclusion, and the elimination of health care disparities.

The Diversity Chair Investigator Award program, which was created by Department of Medicine Chair Bob Harrington and announced during this year’s Diversity and Inclusion week, provides four grants of $50,000…

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