Write a 1–2 page dialogue-centric scene, then copy/paste as a RESPONSE.
2017 Dialogue-Writing Challenge: Day 7
Scott Myers
27

#7 prompt. Somebody is Drunk.

#7 feedback sent.

INT. Polish Hall, WWII veterans sitting, drinking hard.

LECH

Thash whadt I shaid. Rig ga. Rig ga Latvia. Fifty yearsh after…war end.

Michal picks up his whiskey and makes a toast.

MICHAEL

Sheerzs!

Lech picks his whiskey and toasts back.

LECH

Scheers!

He drinks and sets the glass down.

LECH (CONT’D)

Schee, She die. In smell room, alone. Maybe she fell down. (BEAT) I done know. (BEAT) Maybe she banged hed. (BEAT) Maybe she killed. (BEAT) I done know.

MICHAL

KGB?

LECH

No. (BEAT) Nacheeesz.

MiCHAL

Nazi. What? Why? Why wouldn’t why would the Nazis come for her.

LECH

She werk. She werk for Kramer’s. Family. (BEAT) She werk for dhem. Sh,Sh,She was Governess. (BEAT) You know what? They had fortune. She bury it. Their fortune. (BEAT) And with it, she bury her future. For years, yea years, for years she wait for Kramers come back. Even long time. (BEAT) After war. (BEAT) Never come back. She die. (BEAT) With secret.

Lech takes another shot of whiskey.

LECH (CONT’D)

Yesh!

MICHAL

Secret. What secret?

LECH

Her shecret. Jule’s shecret. Where she buried the fortune.

MICHAL

She buried fortune?

LECH

There’s a forjun in prechuus jools buried somewhere on the site of the Kramers metalworking faktree.

MICHAL

Is it still there?

LECH

It’s the Kramer’s forjun. Their grandson’s the rightful and sole air. But he doesn’t know it. Jule, who knew where the fortune buried, is ded. (BEAT) Forever.

MICHAL

Sho, Jule found herself a job (BEAT) Governess, for the Kramer’s. Until the Nazis come.

LECH

The Nazeeez came, set, sent, the creamers to the Jewish ghetto and they took over the grounds of the metalworking factory and set up shop.

MICHAL

So what, the Nazis didn’t know the secret that the jools were buried on the property the creamers property of the metalworking factory?

LECH

No. It’s still there. Nobody knows. END

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