We are excited to see the community’s space mission proposals!

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The submission deadline for the Space Mission Activation Process (SMAP) is on January 6th, at 11pm (PST). We are expecting an eclectic batch of space mission proposals, and have gathered up quite a team of experts to evaluate them. If you’d like to participate as an expert, there is still time for you to join the Evaluation Committee: just send us an email to smap[at]spacedecentral.net with your resume or LinkedIn and we will get back to you.

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Space Decentral uses GitHub as our collaborative project platform, and SMAP proposals will be submitted through the Space Decentral Missions repository. The process should be pretty straightforward to those of you familiar with Github, but for those who aren’t used to it, here is a helpful step-by-step video of the submission process. …


“A single step cannot get you to your destination, and a single person can not change the world. But, a single step begins the journey, and a single person leads the way.” — Mikkel Haaheim

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Through Space Decentral, citizens from around the globe will be able to propose, vote on and participate in the R&D of space projects, making space exploration a feat of humanity rather than that of one or two government agencies. The Space Mission Activation Process (SMAP) is our trial run for this grand vision. We are inviting space enthusiasts like you and me to propose ideas for space missions, and with the help of the community, we will choose the first few projects to develop and launch.

Today I would like to introduce one of our SMAP participants, Mikkel Haaheim. Mikkel, a regular on the Space Decentral Forum, our Facebook and Riot chat, has been actively participating in the discussions from the very beginning. With an unconventional story, Mikkel has proposed no less than three ideas for the SMAP 2019, all equally interesting and challenging. …


Having reached the four-month mark, Space Decentral’s Coral has taught us a lot about crowdsourcing space missions

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Initial Steps

The early days of Coral had 20–25 people who were happy to spend their Monday nights (or Tuesday mornings, depending on where they are located) discussing how and what to 3D print on the Moon. Pretty early we established a few baselines that would guide us throughout the process: 1) Coral shall use a commercial lander, 2) the payload shall stay stationary on the lunar surface, 3) the initial mission shall be ready for launch within 5 years, 4) the payload shall be between 5–10kg, and 5) the cost shall not go over $10mi. …

About

Suzi Bianco

I’m a space architect, excited for what’s to come!

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