by Henry Lieberman

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I always wanted to present a TEDx talk. I’ve felt that way ever since I attended one of the early TED conferences in the 1990s in Kobe, Japan. Then, as now, it was really difficult to even get in. I only got in because I went with my mentor, MIT Professor Muriel Cooper, a speaker, and a longtime colleague of TED founder Richard Saul Wurman. The attendees were an impressive crowd, over half CEOs. One of the
highlights I remember is meeting one of my musical heroes, Herbie Hancock.

I remember, also, that one of the rules that Ricky had, was that each talk had to be something that the speaker had never before presented in public. That way, he prevented the bigshots from giving their canned stump speeches. Another rule was that each talk had to be 17 minutes. If he had said 15 or 20, people would have treated the time
as approximate, but with 17, people had to plan out the speech to hit
the target time. …


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Dr. Alice Han

The #MeToo campaign has shone a light on violence against women and girls (VAWG) in Hollywood, on Capitol Hill, and in at least 85 countries around the world. Ironically, though, VAWG remains hidden to the systems which are trusted to protect, support, and heal — health systems. Health systems are often not responding adequately to patients experiencing VAWG nor committing to the role critically needed by these systems to address it.

As a medical doctor and epidemiologist, I’ve seen the pandemic scale of VAWG from health centers in Kenya, Israel and Brazil to a refugee camp in Greece. I’ve worked to strengthen health systems in Rwanda and the Philippines and currently practice and teach medicine in the US. Among the many forms of VAWG, I focus here on the most common forms worldwide: sexual violence and intimate partner violence. Despite my credentials, when I have tried to advance research or programming to improve awareness of and response to VAWG in different settings, I’ve noticed a theme in the responses from leadership: “It’s a big problem…


TEDxBeaconStreet’s 2017 Speakers are already planning their talks!

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Seeing the future is like flying: Characters in stories long, long ago could do it, and modern humans spent a long time trying to “rediscover” that knowledge, until one day Wilbur and Orville Wright’s plane left the ground and the impossible had become reality.

Are you ready to meet the modern Wilbur & Orville Wright? Because they’re coming to TEDxBeaconStreet this fall, when our 2017 Speakers take the stage!

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One speaker wants to make personalized neuroscience possible. With a map of the neurons that make up your brain, that just might be possible. What could we do for Alzheimer’s, or PTSD, or any other disease, if we could see where in the brain these occurred? …


TEDxBeaconStreet Class of 2017 brings their best pitch!

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Keiko Wakao

Last night, Speakers and organizers gathered to hear the ideas that will develop into TEDxBeaconStreet talks this fall.

People brought their friends, their family, their colleagues, and their best moonshot ideas. Here are a few of the candidates! You can see our fall Speaker lineup here.

Have you ever copied someone’s recipe, but it didn’t turn out quite right? Tim Savas’ food computer could be the solution to your problem! If it spits out the perfect tomato every time, then you’ll always have the perfect sauce.

Keila Wakao is 11 years old and she wants to talk about her father’s cancer diagnosis. …


by Kate Adamala

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In this age of endless personalization, you have your own identity: Your own case on your phone, your own photos on your desk, your own drink exactly how you want it from Starbucks. But what if you also had your own medicine, specifically designed to work best with your body? That’s the frontier of personalized medicine, and it’s happening now.

It’s a truism that people are different. Even identical twins are not truly identical. We understand that every person has a unique, individual combination of tastes, preferences, and traits. True, there are the so-called demographics. …


How speaking up changed my life

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If you haven’t read the beginning of Kitty’s story, you can go to Part 1, It’s Never Too Late to Change, Part 2, Proper Ladies Don’t Give TED Talks, and Part 3, In the Circle of the Red Rug; you’ll get to know an amazing woman!

In my three recent blogs, I shared how weak and boxed in I felt for most of my life. Even while I emerged into the realm of championship surfing, large-canvas painting, and art shows, there was a huge discrepancy between how strong I appeared to others and how hesitant I felt inside. …


Do you know what’s in your food?

by Chunming Liu, Laurent Adamowicz, & Erin Rubin

What’s your breakfast routine?

You might have a favorite cereal that you rely on each day: it’s tasty, it’s quick to prepare, and the label says reassuring things like “low fat” and “whole grain.”

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Americans love processed food for its convenience, addictive taste, and omnipresence. Even the packaging is enticing, listing all the ways the manufacturers care for your health.

Have you ever wondered what makes boring things like whole grains and oats so hard to resist? …


Kitty Pechet’s story of transformation, Part 3

If you haven’t read the beginning of Kitty’s story, you can go to Part 1, It’s Never Too Late to Change, and Part 2, Proper Ladies Don’t Give TED Talks; you’ll get to know an amazing woman!

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By Kitty Pechet

In my previous blog, I shared my amazement and disbelief that the folks at TEDxBeaconStreet believed I had something to offer, and the way their “You-Can-Do-It” energy helped me shift from resistant participant to someone excited to dare tell her story.

All their support and encouragement left me well prepared, but in the moments before the event, I realized how unprepared I felt on some other deeper, inner level. …


TEDxBeaconStreet’s process of preparation for our Speakers is truly unique.

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When you see a TED talk, you get to connect with the speaker for about 10–15 minutes. That’s all they get: 10–15 minutes to introduce themselves, connect with you, share their idea, and get you, their audience, to believe in that idea enough to take it out into the world.

That’s a lot to accomplish in a short amount of time. It can take weeks or months to condense a complicated innovation, an emotionally charged plea, or a lifetime’s work into those few minutes. TED talks are more like an iceberg, and most people only ever see the tip.

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At TEDxBeaconStreet, we’re a little different.

We’re lucky enough to live in a community full of brilliant, engaged, creative people, and we take full advantage of the resources around us. …


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Ani Liu is making plants that love her back

Think of your favorite science fiction movie. What are some staple elements? Some technology, certainly — no sci-fi is complete without spaceships, teleports, or Iron Man suits. More importantly, sci-fi contains an expanded conception of our universe; it is peopled by characters that look and sound like creatures and things we know…just a bit different.

“Just a bit different.” That’s how Ani Liu, Lisa Nip, and our other synthetic biology Speakers see the world. These women see possibility where others see speculation. And they have the tools to make the possible real.

Synthetic biology is a rapidly advancing field that combines evolutionary biology, genetics, computer engineering, biophysics, and other disciplines to create futuristic possibilities from traits already present in various life forms. …

About

TEDxBeaconStreet

We are a community of thinkers, entrepreneurs, teachers, and many others who are dedicated to putting ideas into action. We want ideas to impact the world.

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