The Lie That Has Beguiled A Generation Of Developers
Richard Kenneth Eng
6017

The “use-case” ignorance

This feels more like prose written by Charles Dickens, heavily worded, distasteful and horribly misplaced. I’m no authority to judge a language for it’s pros and cons, unless I have actually used it. Even then the pros and cons are limited to particular use cases, and generalisations seem rather absurd.

Some background story ( Coz we all love narratives )

I encountered programming first when I was 6 years old, writing simple algorithms in BASIC and COBOL. Then started writing C code when I was 14, thanks to a rather delayed exposure to the language. Found it rather masochistic and moved to C++.

Then wrote some Java during my undergraduate years, liked the safety of the virtual machine but was put off by strict typing so moved on to JavaScript.

For my first job I used to write production code in Java, some response JSONs we sent to the API end points were of the magnitude of several megabytes, which can vouch for the scale of the project.

I worked on the front-end team for the same project as well, working with Angular 1.3, consuming those several megabytes of responses to display some data.

I’ve since then worked with a startup that has millions of monthly users, decoupling the PHP based application into independent front-end and backend.

During my undergraduate years, I also did some scripting exercises in SED and Perl both of which are indispensable tools for specific use cases.

Conclusion

I have had prolonged exposures to more languages than most people can name, but at the end they are just tools. They’re only as good as the work people produce using them.

If you’re going to frown upon a chisel for it’s ability to punch a nail in the wall, God help you.

And the reason IT aspirants don’t have to lose sleep over this is because screens and web browsers are here to stay for a while. Once humanity moves into an era of pervasive computing, with no screens and more augmented reality, tech like Unity might take JavaScript’s cake.