The Atlantic
Syndicated stories from The Atlantic

The virus is mutating as expected. We can still stop it.

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Image: The Atlantic


Delaware’s congresswoman thought she might die in the riot at the Capitol. Then her Republican colleagues mocked her for handing out masks while they sheltered together.

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Rep. Lisa Blunt Rochester (D-DE) pays her respects as the Representative John Lewis (D-GA) lies in state at the U.S. Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C. on July 27, 2020. Photo: Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images


Cloth masks are better than nothing, but they were supposed to be a stopgap measure.

Composite photo of three people wearing different styles and colors of masks.
Composite photo of three people wearing different styles and colors of masks.
Photos: Vincent Catala/Agence VU/Red​ux


The federal government must release demographic data about vaccine recipients.

Red vials overlaid over a blurry black-and-white photo of a crowd.
Red vials overlaid over a blurry black-and-white photo of a crowd.
Illustration: The Atlantic; source: Getty Images


When have Americans been willing to admit who we are?

A blue rectangle with white stars with rows of people’s heads wearing red blindfolds, visually referencing the US flag.
A blue rectangle with white stars with rows of people’s heads wearing red blindfolds, visually referencing the US flag.
Photo illustration: The Atlantic; source: CSA Images/Getty Images


Disease narratives maintain certain features over time, even as specific details vary to fit a new epidemic or context.

A syringe being spun in a blur on its central axis in front of a green background.
A syringe being spun in a blur on its central axis in front of a green background.
Photo illustration: The Atlantic


What can we take away from yesterday’s coup attempt?

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Photo: Leah Millis / Reuters


True democracy in America is a young, fragile experiment that must be defended if it is to endure

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Image: The Atlantic


Democrats need to see beyond an electoral map to acknowledge that people are pushing for liberal ideas even in the reddest of areas.

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A demonstration in Berea, Kentucky. Photo: Meg Wilson


The conspiracy theory has been tied to real-life danger — but before it entered the mainstream, one man stumbled upon Q in a game of political predictions.

An online slot machine game called “Betting Against QAnon” with the fruits replaced with Hillary, Trump, covid molecule, Q.
An online slot machine game called “Betting Against QAnon” with the fruits replaced with Hillary, Trump, covid molecule, Q.
Illustration: Matteo Guiseppe Pani

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