Agonizing Over Important Hiring Decision

Important Hiring Decision

It’s late. You are sitting in your office wishing you were home. You spent the day putting out fires and you are finally getting to the things you should have done to help your business grow. You know you need to hire someone, but whom?

Here are your choices: Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders, Ted Cruz, Ben Carson, Marco Rubio, Chris Christie, Jeb Bush and John Kasich. Which of these would you hire for something really important, like your own company?

The Pew Research Center did a survey called Voters Skeptical that 2016 Candidates Would Make Good Presidents. The available choices for each candidate were great, good, average, poor or terrible. Hillary led the great and the good with 35% but finished second in the poor and terrible with 44%. The Donald took top honors in the poor and terrible category with 52% and second at 31% in the great and the good columns. As you move further down the list, ranked according to great and good votes, the average rankings increase as the poor and terrible decrease, but none of the nine candidates gets to the point where more people think he or she will be great or good than poor or terrible.

And don’t bother consulting your co-workers because the Democrats will tell you to hire the Democrats and the Republicans will tell you to hire the Republicans, at least according to these poll rankings.

You are looking for a great candidate for the job at your company but, in each case, more voters think the candidate would be terrible. Looks like you won’t get your hiring decision made on this night and that you will spend tomorrow putting out fires, yet again. And there remains the nagging feeling: do you really want to hire any of them?

Suddenly, there is another choice. According to The New York Times and everyone else in what is clearly not intended to be a secret, Michael Bloomberg is considering an independent run.

It’s a tough slog for an independent and a win would be unprecedented. The two parties have no great interest in seeing a third name on the ballot, as that would diminish the power of the duopoly. It’s also expensive but Bloomberg is allegedly willing to spend $1 billion.

The odds of Bloomberg’s running increase if Bernie Sanders is the Democratic nominee and either Trump or Ted Cruz gets the Republican nod. It is a high-risk plan to root for that outcome because one of the other three candidates is a more likely winner than the independent. But it is tempting.

As you trudge home anticipating another day of fire extinguishing, you might just conclude that primaries, caucuses, political parties, strategists, pollsters and bundlers are no way to pick anything or anyone important. Is it time to think that supporting the political insiders with this stupidity is perhaps too high a price to pay? Or is the president less important than your hiring decision?