Weekly Walkies in Cambridgeshire #1

Cherry Hinton Chalk Pits: In search of the Moon Carrot

Having driven past signs to the Chalk Pits on the edge of Cherry Hinton many times before, we decided to go and see what it offers as a dog-walking spot.

And I’m so glad we did. Our 3.5 yr old son (currently pointing at the screen excitedly: “Quarry!”) was fascinated from the start by the utterly surprising landscape, and our explanation of how we were standing in a huge hole created by the digging up of the chalk.

East Pit: It’s very hard to believe that you’re literally on the outskirts of the Cambridge suburbs.

On entering, we read about the rare Moon Carrot and set off in search of it, but — to be honest — this was quickly forgotten as we all became absorbed by the scale and drama of our surroundings.

Moon Carrot: The rare moon carrot only grows here and at two other locations in the country (Photo by proteinbiochemist from Flickr (CC BY NC 2.0))

Whilst it is an on-lead walk, the fact that we weren’t having to be constantly vigilant with Maggie actually helped us to enjoy this beautiful spot even more. We examined the layered chalk cliffs, jumped off boulders, clambered up slopes, gazed at birds nesting in the cliffs (must remember some binoculars next time) looked at a variety of plant life and generally enjoyed the vast open space and fresh air.

There’s also the smaller pit, Lime Kiln Close, to explore — this has been left to grow for 200 years or so, so provides a great contrast and a short woodland stroll.

Lime Kiln Close

We are sure to be returning in the near future; I don’t think I’ve been on another walk where, despite post walk fatigue setting in, we have had pleas to go back soon from the small person. And maybe next time we’ll find some Moon Carrots.

East Pit: Maggie gives it a high five!

See you next time!

Maggie and The Wuff Guide

Follow me on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram and I’ll share great places to walk, dog-friendly events and days out, recipes for dog treats, instructions for easy-to-make toys and lots more.

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.