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My entire life, nearly all my friends and coworkers have known me as the guy who always has too much energy. Need a song sung for no reason? I got that. Unexpected dance party? I was there. Going to play table tennis? Sign me up for the third time today. Want someone to play with the horde of hyperactive kids at the company party for hours so the other adults have a welcome break? I took one for the team every time. …


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Precursor: This article is the third in a three-part series focused on how Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs comes into play in the workplace. It highlights my own life experiences and how my performance, perspective, and priorities have changed based on which needs of mine were or were not being met. If you haven’t already, we recommend ready part 1 and part 2 first.

Where I was

Within the last year or two, I’ve been seeking physiological needs and safety needs. Just when I thought things couldn’t get any worse, the inevitability of not being cared about as a person in an organization was making itself known. …


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Precursor: This article the second in a three-part series focused on how Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs comes into play in the workplace. It highlights my own life experiences and how my performance, perspective, and priorities have changed based on which needs of mine were or were not being met. If you haven’t already, we recommend reading part 1 first.

Where I was

A couple years ago, I was seeking esteem and love and belonging. I was in the middle of Maslow’s pyramid and I felt mediocre at best. I was working in a world-famous organization known for its culture and employee experience, yet I was no longer as proud of it as I once was. Previously, I would tell anyone I could about it, now I only did when asked directly. …


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Precursor: This article is the first in a three-part series focused on how Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs comes into play in the workplace. It highlights my own life experiences and how my performance, perspective, and priorities have changed based on which needs of mine were or were not being met.

Where I was

Several years back, I was seeking self-actualization. I was at the top of Maslow’s pyramid and I felt like I was on top of the world. I was working in a world-famous organization known for its culture and employee experience and I preached their glory. I had more than I ever thought I would have in life and I felt lucky beyond my wildest dreams. I was responsible for an organizational-wide, multi-year initiative and trusted to make it happen. I had all the workplaces benefits you read about in articles of great places to work and I was making more money than I ever had (and probably ever will). …


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There are many approaches for how to determine how “great” an organization is, from seeing internal survey results to taking a tour of their campus or by emotionally quantifying how much they contribute to social causes. All of these factors can help inspire people and show glimpses of why a company might be doing good in the world and these all ultimately play a part in how good a company is overall.

However, in all companies, no matter how incredible, there are always things happening behind the scenes. In most cases, no matter how many tours you take and books you read, unless you an employee of said company, you will not know what it’s actually like to work there. …


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Photo by Isaac Moore on Unsplash

Two months ago, I lived in Las Vegas, a city of two million people. I had a 1700 square foot home with all the utilities, services, and amenities you could ever hope for. We had food delivered to our doorstep multiple times a week when we were too lazy to leave the house, we had incredibly fast internet, and anything I ever needed was a ten-minute drive at most.

Still, my wife and I packed up all our belongings and pets and drove two thousand miles to move to the other side of the country. Now, we live in a 250 square foot home in a town with a population of less than five hundred. We currently have no electricity, save for the power cords stretched from the neighbors’ house, it takes 30 minutes to drive to the nearest store, nothing short of UPS and FedEx delivers to us, and the wifi we borrow from our neighbors makes for unreliable streaming of casual movies. …


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Photo by Elijah O’Donnell on Unsplash

Every day, there are new books, articles, and posts on social media about how certain companies are leading examples of how organizations should operate. Nearly everyone reading this will have at least one company come to mind if they think about “world-class culture”, “a flawless employee experience”, or “the proper example of what an organization should look like”. In fact, I see daily posts on LinkedIn about just this. Your example may be different than mine, so for the sake of this article, I’ll just call this less-than-hypothetical organization, “Company X”.

As far as the rest of the world knows, Company X is the epitome of what an organization is supposed to be when everything is done right. Company X has explicitly defined core values painted on every wall, quoted in every book, and plastered on every webpage. They make incredible profits and have made every Forbes list. Journalists strive for a chance to write an article about Company X, hundreds of thousands of people try to get hired at Company X, and experts in the field of organizational design always refer to Company X as a prime example of how it should be done. This makes Company X look even better and the cycle repeats. …


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Photo by Vlad Tchompalov on Unsplash

For years, I have been desperately working to build a business and career. The only reason I started my own business is because I wanted to work in a way that truly promoted equality. I wanted flexible prices that anyone could afford, not to be anchored to a particular model so I could help any company at any stage of transformation, and to eventually make enough money that I could contribute to worthwhile causes.

I’ve been trying to brand myself and get my name out there almost exclusively using LinkedIn. The entire time I’ve been building my brand, I’ve actively avoided sharing or commenting on content regarding race. Whenever I saw such conversations pop up on LinkedIn, I would tell myself “it was not the right place”. Like many on the platform, I thought LinkedIn was for professional work discussions while race and inequality should be reserved for Facebook. I was worried that talking about race instead of organizational change would derail my purpose, be too far off from what I normally post about, and risk turning away potential clients who might be averse to my responses and/or willingness to engage in such conversations on a “professional” platform. …


Questo articolo è la traduzione di “Managing the Expectations of Holacracy”, originariamente scritto per Holaspirit.

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Paul Walker all’Holacracy Forum 2019 — Foto Kopernicana

Obiettivo dell’Holacracy Forum 2019 era “ridurre le difficoltà e
aumentare la facilità di adozione di Holacracy”.

Ci sono molte ragioni per cui l’adozione di Holacracy può essere
difficile e stressante, ma credo che la stragrande maggioranza di
queste sfide derivi dalla stessa origine:

la distanza tra ciò che le persone si aspettano da Holacracy e ciò
che realmente sperimentano.

Se un trailer di un film fa pensare che il film sia divertente e pieno di
azione, ma poi scopri che le uniche parti buone del film sono le
poche scene già mostrate nel trailer, resteresti sicuramente deluso; ti
sentiresti ingannato e penseresti di aver buttato via dei
soldi. Probabilmente non andrai più a vedere un film di quel
franchise, avrai una pessima opinione del film stesso e sarai molto
più scettico sulla capacità di un trailer di rappresentare
adeguatamente un film. Immagina invece se il trailer del film dicesse
senza mezzi termini: “Alcune parti sono divertenti e c’è un po’ di
azione, ma comunque è un film abbastanza semplice”.
Probabilmente saresti meno propenso ad andare a vederlo, ma se ci
andassi, non saresti affatto deluso. Avresti avuto quello che ti
aspettavi, saresti più propenso a dargli una buona recensione e
avresti più fiducia nei trailer. …


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Photo by Natasha Connell on Unsplash

If you have ever been involved in a large organizational change — whether experiencing or implementing it — you’ve undoubtedly said or heard something akin to, “How do we make these employees have a mind shift? They are resisting the change because they just don’t want to change. We need people with the right mindset.” This blame-game is not just paramount in nearly every one-on-one conversation but has also been a major talking point at every conference or company-meeting I’ve ever attended.

Admittedly, I used to do this as well for the first few years of my career. I could never figure out the secret to changing other peoples’ minds. I, like many, assumed I was one of the gifted few who “just got it” and was more comfortable with and capable of change. I worked with thousands of other people and assumed the majority of them didn’t have the mentality of wanting to change with the times. …

About

Paul Walker

Employee Experience, Organizational Development, and Self-Management Specialist @ www.Octopy.io

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