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(Saturday Down South)

How Players Can Put an End to Symbols of Racism

My good friend who works closely with D1 college football players told me many athletes are frustrated with the state of our country and the way many university and city leaders are hijacking this cultural moment for their own gain or to save face. Frustrated and eager, they are looking for ways to play a part in bringing about racial justice in America and to apply pressure to those in power.

If that energy can be focused, it seems that players have a profound opportunity in front of them as we look ahead. More specifically, they could make their biggest mark on this country by pledging to boycott the upcoming 2020 football season until our country’s leaders legislate a ban on any public glorification of Confederate memorabilia, including (but not limited to): Confederate flags, statues of Confederate leaders, and street names and schools named after former Confederate authorities. …


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This story was originally published in partnership with Community Frontline

In recent weeks, people have sent me messages of solidarity and pledges to fight for racial justice. To those who have publicly pledged to join the fight to end the injustices in our country in response to the murders of Ahmad Arbury, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd, I’d like a word with you. I’m grateful for your pledge, and I want to be hopeful, but I must be honest: I’m skeptical.

As an African-American man in DFW, I’ve had the pleasure of seeing the most visible endorsements for racial justice than ever before. From coworkers to corporations to even cops, almost everyone is unashamedly championing racial justice on social media. …


ACLU MN
ACLU MN

(This article was written in partnership with Community Frontline)

In 2016, Will Smith spoke candidly about race relations during an interview with Stephen Colbert on The Late Show. “When I hear people say it’s worse than it’s ever been I disagree completely,” Smith said. “Racism isn’t getting worse, it’s getting filmed.” Those words couldn’t be more accurate four years later in 2020 after we’ve witnessed false and potentially fatal 911 calls on African Americans and cold-blooded murders — some filmed and some not.

This is not new. This is not normal. Spanning from about six years ago when people (and kids) like Tamir Rice, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Sandra Bland, Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, and too many others were mercilessly murdered, I, like many others, felt like I was going crazy. Some family and friends felt I was becoming obsessed with trying to figure out how and why a country that supposedly isn’t racist continues to sanction the disproportionate murder and incarceration rates of black people. I needed answers and some sort of rationality as to how and why a supposed “Christian” nation that touts liberty and justice for all is consistently marked by oppression and injustice for some. I read books. I studied beyond the surface-level whitewashed grade school history I received. I listened to podcasts. I wrote articles. All were attempts to grieve and make sense of the assault on black and brown bodies that looked like mine and my friends, and to hopefully educate and liberate my friends and family who failed to see the interwoven effects of white supremacy laced throughout our culture. …


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(IMDb)

“Republicans buy sneakers, too.” Those are the now infamous words said in jest by Michael Jordan. His comment was exposed when asked if he would publicly endorse Harvey Gantt for a North Carolina U.S. Congress seat in 1990. The election featured the African American Democrat Gantt running against the incumbent Republican and covert racist Jesse Helms. Jordan, who, by this time, established his brand as well as his on the court dominance, held in his palms a peculiar and complex responsibility most prominent African American public figures are forced to deal with at some time or another. …


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(The Grio)

(This story was originally published and edited for ChristandPopCulture.com)

The coronavirus pandemic changed our lives. This is no longer a shocking statement. But as the reality began taking form, an anthem of sorts was sounded by Cardi B on March 10, 2020. The rapper, songwriter, and famed social media personality entertainingly announced the disease’s arrival on her Instagram profile after her tour was suspended. On video she expressed her frustrations, doubts, and fears about the virus — emotions most Americans could identify with at the time. Her vulgarity-laced spiel in her chain-linked, see-through dress was quickly transformed into the Billboard chart-topping “Coronavirus” song, remixed and produced by DJ iMarkkeyz. …


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“Wait!” For how long? “Wait for The Lord!” Okay, for how long? “Be strong, and let your heart take courage!” Okay, but for how long? “Wait for The Lord!”

Waiting — remaining idle, not making any decisions for a period of time — is counter to everything we are as a people in America. Productivity — constant movement and production of ideas and creation of financial opportunities — is woven into the fabric of our American norms. We aren’t a culture accustomed to waiting. We need the 5G speeds yesterday. We need our kids to learn and adapt quickly so they too can become producers. It’s not that we don’t mind waiting, but only when we know what is coming (birthdays, holidays, seasons, vacations). …


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12 News Now

Kobe Bryant was transitioning into the “godfather of basketball” role before his tragic death on Sunday, January 26, 2020. The legendary, and soon to be Hall of Famer, tragically died in a helicopter crash in the hills of Southern California alongside his thirteen-year-old daughter, Gianna Bryant, and seven others. The crew were on their way to Gianna’s basketball game. Kobe helped coached that team.

The legend entered the NBA straight out of Lower Merion High School in Pennsylvania. His 20-year career is draped with a tapestry of accolades that include 18 All-Star appearances, 15 nominations to the All-NBA Team , 12 nominations to the All-Defensive Team , a 2008 NBA Most Valuable Player award, the retirement of his Los Angeles Lakers numbers (8 and 24) in the Staples Center, and much more. …


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“Not bad for a running back.” That’s what Baltimore Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson said after he threw five touchdown passes against the Miami Dolphins in the first week of the 2019–2020 NFL season. Those words were a slight jab at his critics (the “experts”) who believed the 6-foot 1-inch, 210 pound Black quarterback was better suited as a running back or wide receiver than a quarterback.

Those same critics will be bathing in their predictions about Jackson after the heavily favored Ravens shockingly lost at home in the playoffs against the Tennessee Titans 12–28 in the Divisional Round. But to take away from what Jackson accomplished this season, against the odds of conventionalism at the quarterback position, would be a disservice to the city of Baltimore and a detriment to what the sport of football can be at the quarterback position moving forward. …


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KOD, an album by hip hop artist J. Cole, was released April 20, 2018. The release day, 4/20 or “smoke day” — a day some use to celebrate recreational smoking, primarily marijuana — was by design. At first glance, the album cover artwork looks like a celebration of 4/20. A king resembling J. Cole appears to influence a group of kids under his regal cape. The teens smoke marijuana, snort cocaine, pop pills, and sip lean as their figures slowly morph into skeletons the more they are influenced, or consumed, by Cole. …


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When I arrived at Hardin Simmons University in Abilene, Texas, I was quickly immersed in West Texas traditions. This included an undesired baptism into the abyss of country music. The inescapable honky-tonk sounds flooded the dormitory halls and our football locker room. I hated it. As far as I knew, country music contradicted everything about my culture. Hip hop better defined who I was. …

About

Timothy

Full-time husband. Part time educator. Professional Amatuer. Timothytt.com/

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