Especially after you’ve done something that gets that kind of attention.
It’s easy to get trapped into the idea of creating for the sake of gaining approval, affirmation…
amanda weedmark
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How to Keep Going After You Taste Success

Here is the dilemma:

1. Art comes from the heart, soul, and emotion.

2. Once produced, art is then exposed to harsh logic, critique, and opinion.

Which means the artist must:

1. Connect to herself and other beings on a level most never reach. In a sense, she becomes her art

2. Release her work into the world and allow it to be what it is, not what she hoped it would be.

No wonder a lot of us go mad.

Here is an unrelatable but interesting example:

In 2009, a musician named Mohamed invited several of his colleagues to lay down lyrics to a idea he’d been obsessed with. He loved the beat. But when a man named Faheed sang the hook, he knew the song would become an anthem.

“All I Do is Win” exploded. It is, in fact, the anthem Mohamed (DJ Khaled) thought it would be, going platinum 3 times. That means the song has sold 3,000,000 copies.

That was 6 years ago. Khaled and his friend Faheed (T-Pain) made enough money to never work again.

So what are they doing?

Khaled, of course, has found fame again as a Snapchat icon.

But what about T-Pain?

Well, he’s released a few more albums. He cut off his trademark dreads. Most recently, he’s working on something called “Stoicville: The Phoenix.”

Ever heard of that?

Me neither. I mean, until I Googled it a couple minutes ago.

Will it perform like “All I Do Is Win?”

Probably not.

What’s my point?

Artists do what artists do.

We do what is important to us, when it is important to us, no matter the business outcome.

You do it. I do it. T-Pain does it.

We do it not because we think it will be loved, but because it needs to be said.

Saying what needs to be said is, after all, what an artist craves the most.

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