COMPETIFY’s Partners for the Cure: FCC Comment Summary — CliffsNotes Edition

The quotes below were taken from the comments filed with the FCC on June 28, 2016 by COMPETIFY’s Partners for the Cure.

Why are Business Data Services So Important?

“Access to high-capacity BDS at competitive rates is critical to new technological developments on the horizon, including 5G. High-capacity BDS — especially above 50 Mbps — will take on even greater importance as consumer usage increases and network demands skyrocket.” — Competitive Carriers Association (Page 3)

“The advent of 5G wireless promises radical increases in the ability of the nation’s communications networks to support high-bandwidth applications; enable ultra-reliable, low latency communications; and make the “Internet of Things” (IoT) a reality. But, as Chairman Wheeler has recognized, the ability of 5G to deliver on any of these promises depends heavily on wireless providers’ access to cost-effective BDS at hundreds of thousands if not millions of locations.” — Public Knowledge; Open Technology Institute at New America; Common Cause; Next Century Cities; Engine; and Schools, Health & Libraries Broadband Coalition (Page 2)

“The market power that incumbent BDS providers possess in the vast majority of geographic markets allows them to charge exorbitant prices for this essential connectivity and impose billions of dollars in unnecessary costs on American businesses, anchor institutions, and consumers. This longstanding tax on economic growth, investment, employment and innovation must end.” — Public Knowledge; Open Technology Institute at New America; Common Cause; Next Century Cities; Engine; and Schools, Health & Libraries Broadband Coalition (Page 15)

“BDS reform will also bring substantial benefits to America’s schools and libraries. Reasonably priced BDS will help ensure that these anchor institutions have access to affordable broadband at bandwidths necessary to meet the needs of their communities. In fact, 41 percent of schools do not yet meet the Commission’s short-term connectivity goal of 100 Mbps for every 1,000 students and approximately 42 percent of libraries have broadband connections no greater than 10 Mbps.” — Public Knowledge; Open Technology Institute at New America; Common Cause; Next Century Cities; Engine; and Schools, Health & Libraries Broadband Coalition (Page 4)

“[A]n increasingly important component of the projected growth in global IP traffic is from mobile traffic and connected devices known as part of the IoT. By 2020, there will be 3.4 networked devices per capita — an increase from 2.2 in 2015. [T]he proliferation of connected devices and increase in mobile traffic will place profound constraints on telecommunications networks and infrastructure. Carriers will need to utilize more backhaul to connect additional antennae and towers to their networks. However, the high prices that ILECs charge for BDS placing significant constraints on competitors. For example, connecting a tower to a wireless carrier’s network can amount to roughly one-quarter of the tower’s operating cost.” — Computer & Communications Industry Association (Pages 3–4)

“In an August 2004 analysis filed in this docket, Ad Hoc’s economic consultants estimated that special access prices were set at levels that were generating about $15 million per day beyond what would have been expected in a competitive market. In the 4,300 days that have lapsed since that analysis, that amount adds up to more than $64 billion in overcharges imposed on BDS customers.” — The Ad Hoc Telecommunications Users Committee (Pages 7–8)