Human vulnerability in Arab countries at the time of a pandemic

Although COVID-19 is neither the first nor the deadliest (so far) pandemic in the history of humanity, it promises to redefine our societies with wide-ranging consequences on the way we live, we work, we learn, we consume, and more. (Source: Visual Capitalist)
Official counts. Relatively low numbers in some cases may be attributed to shortages of testing kits. (Source: WHO)
On methodology, only five Arab countries surveyed are scoring above 50. On periodicity, the region is doing better despite reversals in seven countries in the last 10 years. Source data scores saw the largest drops. (Source: World Bank)
Daily life at a standstill. Clockwise from the top left: Beirut, Lebanon; Cairo, Egypt; Najaf, Iraq and Gaza, Palestine. (Source: BBC)
Close to 60% of the population in the Arab region live in urban areas, most in agglomerations above 1 million inhabitants. (Source: UN DESA)
Informal workers are particularly vulnerable to the economic consequences of the pandemic as many of them are poor and lack social protection coverage. (Source: ILO 2018)
Poorer respondents are more likely to forego medical treatment and advice because of cost concerns. (Source: UNDP survey)
By 2030, if ongoing conflicts are not resolved, 40% of the population in the Arab region will be living in crisis countries (Iraq, Palestine Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen), a majority of which will be under the age of 30. (Source: UN DESA)
The wide range of government expenditure on health per capita reflects the disparities in income between countries across the region, but even the high-income GCC countries are spending much less than their counterparts in the same income group. By contrast, Arab countries rank high on the Military Expenditure Index published by the Bonn International Center for Conversion, which looks at military spending in relation to GDP and health spending. (Source: World Bank)
The growth rate of GDP per capita in the region has been below the global average since the 2011 uprisings and was close to zero in 2018, the latest available year. (Source: World Bank)
The year 2020 marked the beginning of the Decade of Action to deliver the SDGs but COVID-19 is threatening to backtrack progress on their implementation. (Source: United Nations)

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UNDP's Regional Bureau for Arab States. Working together for a brighter future across the Arab World. Speak Arabic? Follow @UNDPArabic too!

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UNDP Arab States

UNDP Arab States

UNDP's Regional Bureau for Arab States. Working together for a brighter future across the Arab World. Speak Arabic? Follow @UNDPArabic too!

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