Children cannot wait

With the support of the Education Cannot Wait fund, UNICEF supports the education of children affected by the Lake Chad crisis and build brighter futures. Meet with them.

Since 2015, around 130,000 people fled the conflict in the Lake Chad because of Boko Haram’s related violence. When children are uprooted from their homes, they lose much more than the roof over their heads. Without access to education, they risk losing their futures. In the Lake Chad region, too many children and youth are either already missing out on their education, receiving poor quality schooling or at risk of dropping out of school altogether. Education Cannot Wait is a new fund to drive investment in education for children and youth affected by humanitarian emergencies and protracted crises.

UNICEF Chad/2017/Sokhin

In the 54 revitalized schools supported by UNICEF in the Lake Chad region, 18,000 children newly enrolled get a chance to be children after years of displacement and distress. 90% of the refugee and and displaced children never attended school before the conflict.

UNICEF Chad/2017/Sokhin

Blue backpacks blend into a colorful scene as children wait in line for their school meal at the Yakoua school in Bol. Life is not easy for displaced families and the mid-day meal help to keep children into school and learn in good conditions.

UNICEF Chad/2017/Sokhin

Two classmates take a break to get some water on their way to the playground of Daresalam refugee camp school (Lake Region, Chad). Their families fled Nigeria after Boko Haram attacked their homes. For these refugee children, ‘home’ is now a distant place but school is the foundation for a brighter future.

UNICEF Chad/2017/Sokhin

Boys of the School of Peace in Kousseri IDP site, playing football. In this school, 60% of children are displaced from the islands and the other 40% are from host communities. School is what unites these children and sport can bridge divides and be a powerful tool to promote peace and friendship.

UNICEF Chad/2017/Sokhin

“Girls can succeed in school. There are many educated women in Chad. Why not me? Among my relatives, no one has has ever been to school but I would like to be the first intellectual mother of the family” she says. Halima Mahamat Ibrahim, 17, mother of a child born right after the Boko Haram attack.

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