Task Analysis: How to paint a wall like a UX Designer

Some would argue that task analysis is one cornerstone of instructional research design. But just what is task analysis? Well, it literally is what you think. During the UX Research phase, it is common that you observe your users behaviors before you create your final product. Literally you analyze a task step by step, and document how this task is completed.

Sounds straightforward, and easy to do? Looks may be deceiving. It turns out that even the most basic of tasks can be broken down into more complex steps than you think. Let’s me teach you how to paint a wall. Perhaps it would take 2 to 3 steps at most? Well, I was able to break it way down. Lets begin.

How a UX Designer can paint a wall in 10 steps:

  1. Identify the Stakeholders: The stakeholders in this case are your Roommate, yourself, and Landlord. Let your roommate know you think that the current acid-washed 1000 year old wallpaper situation in your condo needs an update. Check in with your hipster roommate to see if he agrees that ,YES, it’s time to for a new look. Once you get the approval of your roommate, be sure to get the confirmation of your landlord to check if there is no violation of building policy. DO IT NOW.

2. Hold interview & Generate a project vision: After you get the go-ahead from all your Stakeholders, it’s time to sit down and talk your Roommate. Create a pinterest board, Search on Google, Youtube, and generate a vision for your new wall. Ask yourselves key questions about color, patterns, type of paint, and style. Does a particular color stand out that you’ve read about in your mothers Feng Shui Book? Who will paint the wall? And how much would this all cost? Where will I purchase the supplies? Figure out your initial preferences.

3. Segment the Market: Designers may use customer segmentation to classify various types of customers into specific groupings, ultimately making it easier to target products or communications tailored to the group’s preferences or needs. Give it a try in figure out the demographics, purchasing behavior/ buying patters, color preferences, and possibilities for color blindness of yourself and roommate. Some data points used for segmentation include:

  • Demographics
  • Purchase Behaviors/Buying Patterns
  • Preferences

4. Build User Profiles: UX designers use personas to get a deeper understanding of whom they are designing for as well as the wants, needs, and motivations of various types of site visitors. The creation of personas is necessary in order to build user flows that depict an overall user experience that make sense for specific types of people.

Some data points used to develop personas include:

  • Behaviors
  • Attitudes
  • Journeys

5. Build Environment Profile: UX designers use personas to get a deeper understanding of whom they are designing for as well as the wants, needs, and motivations of various types of site visitors. The creation of personas is necessary in order to build user flows that depict an overall user experience that make sense for specific types of people. Build a persona for your environment.

Some data points for environmental personas:

  • Room Color
  • Furniture
  • Structure of wall

6. Identify Red Routes: are frequent and critical activities that user will perform with design. In this case, how will people interact with the painted wall on a common basis? Will they look at the wall often? Will they lean against the wall? Will they hang things on the wall? Will they draw on the wall? Once you find that out, you are now able to funnel this information in key actions to concentrate on designing so that you can generate the best painted wall.



7. Research & Prepare for a Solution:

You’ve received initial approval from the stakeholders, now you should use the all previous information you’ve already gathered to generate a design solution. Return to Pinterest for colors, shades, and types of paint you’ve saved on your board. Secretly read your Mom’s Feng Shui Book. Find out if orange is your zen color and if it matches your energy? Find out if your wall needs to be prepared in anyway, and what type of paint will actually stay on? Do all technical preparation in the room before hand!

  • Blue Tape the Corners of the Wall
  • Cover the ground with newspaper
  • Move furniture & Frames out of the way

8. Design Interaction(Sketch a prototype) and then Paint The Wall: Draw a sketch of your wall you plan to paint. And once again, run the color and design past your roommate. Then it’s time to get painting!

Up! Down! Very good Daniel Son! -Mr. Miyagi

10. Evaluate Usability: Make sure that everyone is happy Double check to see if that amazing design wall stand up to your expectations over time. Check in with your roommate in a day, a month, a year and so on to see if your awesome wall needs to be re-painted. If so, tell them its their turn.

DIY Retro Diamond Focal Wall