Great founders fail, and weak ones grow to be great. Impenetrable markets open up, and large markets vanish. Defensible technologies get defeated, and no technology edge produces razor sharp results. Rocketship growth runs out of fuel, and tortoises beat hares.
The Agony of Being Right
Bryce Roberts
3836

This is so Yeats-ean. For we know…

Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
 Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,

I find sometimes it is best to function like there is no center. I try to create processes in my life, which are non-linear, and so lead to unexpected lovely discoveries and paths. For example, I once thought I would become a mathematician, and now I work in technology product marketing and strategy (and I love it). I promise, this was not a linear path. Along the way I thought I might go into fashion design, law, and finance. None the less, the first has definitely informed the latter.

Growth that moves in spirals may look like going in circles from the outside, especially in the short term. Eventually, it does become clear that you aren’t revolving around a single point, but around an axis. Thankfully this means you are spiraling upward!

Non-linear growth means, life is full of surprises. Upon reaching the third rung of the spiral you could find a secret trap door, unseen before, leading to a nice climbable ladder. Conversely, the trap door could be a smooth slide back to where you started three rungs down. You can only find out by jumping down the hatch sometimes.

I can imagine such an approach in a group setting as well. It could allow for more independence, creativity, and ownership for all parties. But also a little bit of chaos, which could potentially be worth it if the group is ready for it.

No matter what the objective of the group, the members would need to have faith in each other’s abilities. No trust falls necessary though. They also need to be prepared to tread on each others toes a little bit and try different approaches without reprisal. Could look like lots of going in circles in such a scenario, until your spark a great idea seemingly out of nowhere.

This is how I sometimes approach problems myself. First, I come up with the solution I believe is best. Second, I like to flip it on it’s head instead of proceeding to acting or even testing my first approach. I like playing devils advocate with myself. I believe questioning my initial instincts sharpens them.