An Open Letter to Fellow Minority Journalists
jay caspian kang
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“… vent about the totemic whiteness of the place we had dreamt of working our entire lives.”

This article could use some perspective that is provided in a more comprehensive way here. Some highlights of this study:

Print Journalism: Minority graduates are 17% less likely to find jobs than white students. (Source: University of Georgia)

Broadcasting: Minority graduates are 17% less likely to find jobs than white students. (Source: University of Georgia)

Public Relations: Minority graduates are 25% less likely to find jobs than white students. (Source: University of Georgia)

Advertising: Minority graduates are 2% less likely to find jobs than white students. (Source: University of Georgia)

Factors in discrepancy:

“Nieman Reports has noted that minority students are less likely to serve on campus newspapers because they are more likely to attend colleges without the resources to support a newspaper or to feel ostracized by a mostly white newsroom.

Second, minority students are less likely to complete unpaid internships. As The Atlantic wrote in 2013: ‘Unpaid internships compound diversity concerns by reserving entry-level journalism positions to financially advantaged youth who can afford to work for free.’

Lastly, minority students often aren’t in the hiring networks that editors rely on to find job candidates. Shani O. Hilton, executive editor at BuzzFeed, wrote on Medium that she believes minority journalists are so busy working twice as hard for half of the credit that they overlook the importance of networking.”

I’d be curious to know how GPA is reflected in minority students performance but could not find data from graduation reports to analyze (I suspect it isn’t substantial, but it is better to be more comprehensive in analysis than not). Overall, these statistics cover incoming employment figures with regards to qualifications, which is important since population proportionality provides more of an apples-to-oranges comparison. Still, these figures help shed light on an areas with apparent discriminatory practices. There are potential solutions to these discrepancies that appear promising as they further close these gaps. And while minority discrimination does appear to be problematic as demonstrated by such analysis, I do wonder if gender discrimination is a larger issue given that women tend to dominate men with regards to graduation rates/qualifications.

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