SkyTg 24 Economia interviewed Giovanni Ottati, CEO of VueTel Italia

After the serious attack which took place on the 18th March at the Bardo Museum in Tunis journalists, analysts and international public opinion have many questions and concerns. .

Within the economic television program of Sky Tg24 on March 19th, the impact of the attacks claimed by Isis on society and the economy were fully discussed. In the episode hosted by Alessandro Marenzi and entitled “Terrorism S.P.A.”, among the important guests (Gabriele Iacovino of Ce.Si, Andrea Mele, VP of Astoi and Graziella Giangiulio of AGC Communication) there was also Giovanni Ottati, CEO of VueTel Italia. Ottati brought his point of view to the discussion as an entrepreneur who has been working in Africa for years.

The following is an excerpt from the contribution by Giovanni Ottati on Sky TG 24 Economia after the attacks in Tunisia.

Alessandro Marenzi

Would we be too optimistic in describing Tunisia as a stable country, not to be destabilised by these events?

Giovanni Ottati

Tunisia is a more robust country than one might think: it is a very strong country as shown over the last three years since the revolution; it has been able to rebuild a fabric of society, new institutions and has succeeded in beginning a democratic path which is extremely important. Moreover, Tunisia is a country that is fundamental to the Mediterranean region and its economy and it also knows suffer. Tunisia was able to accommodate about two million Libyans… it is not easy to integrate two million Libyans in a country of 13 million inhabitants, if you consider the many social and political implications this entails. This shows how strong Tunisia is.

Alessandro Marenzi

VueTel Italia is active also in areas that are experiencing a more difficult situation compared to Tunisia, for example like Libya: is it still possible to do business there?

Giovanni Ottati

Definitely yes, while we mention the ISIS settlements in Sirte and Derna when we talk about Libya, we fail to mention there are extremely vital components of that country. If today we communicate by phone or exchange e-mail with Libya, it means that telecommunication systems are working, it means that there are people who work and ensure communications to and from Libya and the rest of the world. In additional there are companies in Libya working tirelessly: for example the local power company, Gecol, which ensures the smooth running of the electric power distribution network throughout the country.
There are a number of vital components in Libya which are currently running the country and the economy. There are certainly critical situations; there is a civil war. There are factions that are trying to find reconciliation.
Our Prime Minister, Matteo Renzi, and the United Nations Special Representative Bernardino Leon as well as the President of Egypt, Abd al-Fattāḥ al-Sīsī, are working with extreme intelligence to assist the factions of this country to find reconciliation one day. Let me say this again, it will take time but there are some positive energies which we must work on to restart this country.
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