WPP Stream Thinking Makes You Harder To Kill

Whoop! Play boosts the immune system. True story, it enables our brains to positively overcome our fears, inhibitions and inherent baggage to actively Think Differently. It cajoles us to face challenges in a non-threatening way, forging new pathways and opening our minds to possibilities never imagined…

A downloadable toaster? Grannies who code? Creativity bots? Gamifying cancer? WTF?

The world has never been more exciting than right now, today.

Tech, creativity and science are merging like never before and offering up super crazy possibilities to our many worldly challenges previously thought untouchable, unsolvable, un-imaginable.

Conn Bertish giving his Ignite Talk at WPP Stream 2016

This is the elixir of refreshing thinking that sums up the 3 day WPP Stream (un)conference held in Greece last week — an eclectic gathering of smarts, techs, connectors and brand innovators bouncing new thinking in one welcoming embracive space — and the very reason why a guy with multiple (literal) holes in his head travelled for 26 hours to be there — and share his Stream Thinking approach to tackling cancer.

And it’s why WPP Stream invited him to write this blogpost.

Hi I’m Conn (if you met me in Greece, share the love). I’m the creative director, brain cancer survivor and startup founder of Cancer Dojo — a builder of support tools to help people facing cancer. My mission is big, and it’s the reason I resigned from my job last year, gulp. I’m in the process of gamifying the world’s most feared disease with Google, a bunch forward thinking brands and WPP agencies around the world — All with an aim to increasing the global survival rate and activating humans and brands to find their purpose and become happier, healthier and harder to kill.

So when I bounced onto the Stream stage making jokes about the holes in my head and the playful genre redefining work I’m up to with Cancer Dojo, I was blown away by your support!

And this is power of Stream Thinking, in action.

And where you come in. We’re in the process of building a mobile app to support those facing cancer — and it’s almost there, but we need $150 000 to get us to the final hurdle of launching in March 2017.

Stream legend and WPP Digital director Dave Moore has thrown down the challenge to you other Streamers and supporters to equal his first $1000 donation and get Cancer Dojo project to it’s $150 000 target.

Conn Bertish at WPP Stream 2016

Have a look at what we’re up to at www.cancerdojo.org

Watch this cool feature on us here http://carteblanche.dstv.com/player/1104524/

And donate here.

Because Stream Thinking is all about making ideas happen.

Thank you Streamers you Rock!

Banking details:

And help us here:

Bank: FNB
Branch code: 200909
Account name: PLWC — Cancer Dojo
Account no: 62514738014
Swift code: FIRNZAJJ


Conn Bertish is a multiple internationally awarded creative director, cancer survivor and creative consultant — dubbed an agent provocateur by the local media, he is considered one of top creative thinkers in South Africa.

An ex JWT Global Creative Council member and Cape Town Design Network Steering Committee partner, Conn has represented South Africa as a speaker, judge and winner at Cannes Lions Festival and has received accolades at all the big ad award shows around the world.

Conn was the first traditional Executive Creative Director in SA to take over a purely digital agency — Quirk — in 2013.

Conn’s passion for work with a ‘purpose’ led to his role of Creative Director for the 2014 World Design Capital Cape Town.

His focus on creativity, technology and health has led to many accolades in environmental, social and public benefit festivals. His most recent shift is the launch of Cancer Dojo, a two-time South African winner of the Vodacom Change The World program — a non-profit social enterprise that harnesses creativity and neuropsychology to empower people facing cancer.

Conn is a keynote speaker and creative consultant.

Find our more about him here @connbertish

And here www.connbertish.com

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