This content is part of a series highlighting the apartment industry’s response to the health and economic crises spurred by COVID-19 and how they are protecting and supporting their residents and their employees.

Apartment buildings face a unique challenge during the COVID-19 pandemic, serving as both a home to nearly 40 million Americans as well as a place of work. Across the country, these employees are depended on to provide security and support more than ever by residents during this unprecedented period of shelter-at-home orders.

Recognizing that their employees are going above and beyond to ensure that operations run smoothly…


This content is part of a series highlighting the apartment industry’s response to the health and economic crises spurred by COVID-19 and how they are protecting and supporting their residents and their employees.

Toilet paper deliveries to all 373 units, organizing visits from local food trucks with no-contact service and developing flexible payment plans, including waived late fees. Those are just a few of the many ways that employees at 2000 West Creek Apartments in Richmond, Virginia are going above and beyond in supporting residents during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to Richmondmom.com. …


This content is part of a series highlighting the apartment industry’s response to the health and economic crises spurred by COVID-19 and how they are protecting and supporting their residents and their employees.

In response to the pandemic, Philadelphia-based real estate developer and property manager Pennrose has established the Resident Relief Fund. It will provide food to residents who are unable to access food safely or afford enough food to feed their families during the COVID-19 crisis. The fund will also help cover household bills and basics for residents who are experiencing financial hardships from loss of employment due to the coronavirus and who are unable to pay for essential living expenses other than food. The Pennrose Foundation is matching contributions to the fund up to $25,000.

Read the full piece here: Pennsylvania Company Establishes Fund to Help Residents


This content is part of a series highlighting the apartment industry’s response to the health and economic crises spurred by COVID-19 and how they are protecting and supporting their residents and their employees.

The Miami Herald recently highlighted the José Milton family and United Property Management’s donation of 300 fully furnished apartment units for medical staff of Jackson Health System to live in free of charge during the pandemic. Valued at $2.2 million, the donation will keep doctors and nurses from having to sleep in offices or cars for fear of infecting their families with the coronavirus. …


This content is part of a series highlighting the apartment industry’s response to the health and economic crises spurred by COVID-19 and how they are protecting and supporting their residents and their employees.

Bisnow recently highlighted Houston-based Camden Property Trust’s $5 million financial relief fund for residents affected by COVID-19. The fund received an overwhelming response as residents faced financial uncertainty and looming bill deadlines. More than 2,500 eligible residents submitted applications within 16 minutes, effectively claiming all of the available funds. Camden Properties, which has more than 56,000 units across 164 properties in eight states, provided residents up to $2,000 in non-repayable grants that could be used at their discretion through the relief fund.

Read the full piece here: Camden’s $5M Resident Relief Fund Empties In 16 Minutes


Many communities are revamping outdated policies that get in the way of building the housing America needs. Here’s why it should be a nationwide discussion.

Minneapolis did it. Seattle has done it. Dozens of cities and towns in Massachusetts have done it. They’ve pushed back against the conventional wisdom on zoning that says municipalities should devote a large share of their land to single-family housing. Instead, these communities are focused on how to add “gentle density” to create more housing options to what is called “the missing middle,” which includes duplexes, triplexes and quadplexes.

Civic leaders across the country are…


A briefing memo highlighting the apartment industry’s impact on the U.S. economy

Housing is a vital and pressing issue in communities across the nation. And many municipalities — large and small, rural and urban — face a common challenge: They are simply not building enough housing to meet demand. That shortage is a key driver of rising rents that you might be witnessing in your area. We must act quickly because many working people are already being priced out. The U.S. will need to build 328,000 new apartments per year until 2030 just to meet current demand and improve affordability.


Whether running for local, statewide or national office, aspiring lawmakers must show they’ll take action on one of the most pressing issues of our time.

Across the nation, many communities face a common challenge: They are simply not building enough apartment housing to meet demand. That housing shortage is a key driver of rising rents in many parts of the country.

The problem isn’t going away soon: The United States needs to build 328,000 new apartment homes every year until 2030 to address a fundamental supply and demand imbalance caused by shifting demographic trends, as distinct groups show a growing…


Two economists debunk the claims of challengers to new multifamily housing construction

More than one-third of U.S. households are renters, the highest share in nearly 40 years. Spending from those 38.7 million apartment residents contributes $3.4 trillion to the national economy each year, and the operation of the country’s 20.7 million apartment homes contributes $175.2 billion.

Billions of dollars in taxes and millions of jobs are among the other clear economic benefits of apartments, according to Eileen Marrinan and Robert Hess, co-authors of “The Contribution of Multifamily Housing to the U.S. Economy.” …


Renowned developer Jonathan Rose explains how he builds sustainable, affordable communities and how local policies and infrastructure can support that goal

Born into a prominent New York real estate family, Jonathan Rose joined the family business in 1976, shortly after college. Throughout his childhood in the socially conscious 1960s, he says, he’d developed a strong interest in advancing social justice and civil rights and combatting poverty. So, while he launched his career in real estate, he also served as a board member for a local nonprofit organization that built housing for homeless seniors, among other things.

Rose yearned to bring…

We Are Apartments

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store