I Didn’t Catch Your Name
Dennett
1224

“[…] He said you didn’t talk down to him like most people do. You talked to him man-to-man […] Well, that’s what it was — two men having a conversation on a train.”

I’ve had a number (3? 4?) of similar experiences myself.

In advance, people have warned me that the child/young adult in question was extremely autistic, didn’t take to people well, would be uncommunicative and difficult to talk to.

I’ve then met said child/young adult.

They have behaved no differently to any other similarly aged individuals I have met anywhere/anywhen else in my life, been perfectly personable, easy to talk to (within the bounds of their age group) and pleasant company.

Afterwards, everyone has observed how remarkable … almost to the point of miraculous … it was that my companion took to me so quickly and how open they were, because normally they’re not like that but anxious to hostile and very difficult to impossible to communicate with.

My own observation has been that I did nothing out of the ordinary and behaved as I would do with anyone else. Frankly, I have yet to understand the prior fuss made because nobody’s dire prognostications have ever proven in the least bit accurate; none of the encounters has proven difficult — on the contrary, my companions have all been pleasant and interesting company.

In short, they have all simply been people.

I love, therefore, your husband’s explanation; it’s exactly my own experience of meeting people—some of whom are labelled as ‘faulty’ but all of whom are different to everyone else in their own unique way … people, not conditions or illnesses or labels and I have yet to understand why it is supposed to be different to that. Thankyou, both, for sharing it.

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