The seven people you need on your Big Data team

The seven people you need on your Big Data team

Congratulations! You just got the call — you’ve been asked to start a data team to extract valuable customer insights from your product usage, improve your company’s marketing effectiveness, or make your boss look all “data-savvy” (hopefully not just the last one of these). And even better, you’ve been given carte blanche to go hire the best people! But now the panic sets in — who do you hire? Here’s a handy guide to the seven people you absolutely have to have on your data team. Once you have these seven in place, you can decide whether to style yourself more on John Sturges or Akira Kurosawa.

Before we start, what kind of data team are we talking about here? The one I have in mind is a team that takes raw data from various sources (product telemetry, website data, campaign data, external data) and turns it into valuable insights that can be shared broadly across the organization. This team needs to understand both the technologies used to manage data, and the meaning of the data — a pretty challenging remit, and one that needs a pretty well-balanced team to execute.

The Handyman can take a couple of battered, three-year-old servers, a copy of MySQL, a bunch of Excel sheets and a roll of duct tape and whip up a basic BI system in a couple of weeks. His work isn’t always the prettiest, and you should expect to replace it as you build out more production-ready systems, but the Handyman is an invaluable help as you explore datasets and look to deliver value quickly (the key to successful data projects). Just make sure you don’t accidentally end up with a thousand people accessing the database he’s hosting under his desk every month for your month-end financial reporting (ahem).

Really good handymen are pretty hard to find, but you may find them lurking in the corporate IT department (look for the person everybody else mentions when you make random requests for stuff), or in unlikely-seeming places like Finance. He’ll be the person with the really messy cubicle with half a dozen servers stuffed under his desk.

The talents of the Handyman will only take you so far, however. If you want to run a quick and dirty analysis of the relationship between website usage, marketing campaign exposure, and product activations over the last couple of months, he’s your guy. But for the big stuff you’ll need the Open Source Guru.

2. The Open Source Guru I was tempted to call this person “The Hadoop Guru”. Or “The Storm Guru”, or “The Cassandra Guru”, or “The Spark Guru”, or… well, you get the idea. As you build out infrastructure to manage the large-scale datasets you’re going to need to deliver your insights, you need someone to help you navigate the bewildering array of technologies that has sprung up in this space, and integrate them.

Open Source Gurus share many characteristics in common with that most beloved urban stereotype, the Hipster. They profess to be free of corrupting commercial influence and pride themselves on plowing their own furrow, but in fact they are subject to the whims of fashion just as much as anyone else. Exhibit A: The enormous fuss over the world-changing effects of Hadoop, followed by the enormous fuss over the world-changing effects of Spark. Exhibit B: Beards (on the men, anyway).

So be wary of Gurus who ascribe magical properties to a particular technology one day (“Impala’s, like, totally amazing”), only to drop it like ombre hair the next (“Impala? Don’t even talk to me about Impala. Sooooo embarrassing.”) Tell your Guru that she’ll need to live with her recommendations for at least two years. That’s the blink of an eye in traditional IT project timescales, but a lifetime in Internet/Open Source time, so it will focus her mind on whether she really thinks a technology has legs (vs. just wanting to play around with it to burnish her resumé).

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