Timing is the Absolute Worst

The glorious return of a daily (I swear), slightly negative review of the previous evening’s Brewer Game, whether I happen to watch it or not.

When I make a goal, I vaguely comprehend that something will get in the way. However, I ignore that sense of possible doom with the self-reassurance that I will overcome that obstacle. Then that obstacle trips me up regardless.

Such was the fate of my plan for daily recaps of Brewer’s games. It all seemed so reasonable: my boss was on vacation, the busy season had abated, I learned that my work’s internet filters were very permissive. But then a co-worker quit, the boss returned, the Olympics made writing about a sub-.500 baseball team seem trivial, and work filters seemed to catch on to whatever I was doing.

So the recaps subsided. Until we hired someone decent, the Olympics started feeling like they were on the downswing, and the work filters were reset once again in my favor.

Now there are no excuses. Now it is time to perform.

In last night’s game, two Brewers that were supposed to be franchise cornerstones acted like it. Ryan Braun has been doing his best to have the league think of more than piss cups when they say his name all season. He continued his tear, with two home runs, a double, and six RBIs. On the mound, fresh from his Triple-A exile, Wily Peralta pitched six innings of one run ball.

Just one season ago, Wily Peralta got his own bobblehead. This season he’s been an afterthought of missed potential. Hopefully he, like Braun, can get his career back on track. Unfortunately, all these mini-Resurrections come in the context of a lost season.

Braun’s return to form and Wily’s one game of good pitching came in the same season where the biggest success was building up a farm system. Not to denigrate the impressive rebuilding that GM David Stearns has undertaken, but people have argued you need a great rotation to win the World Series, and others have argued you need a great bullpen. No one has ever argued that a great A ball team ever won the big league club a championship.

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