Sign in

Of Course I Still Love You, Ruby

After deciding to build a Personal Weather Station, and reading through this excellent resource to guide me (thank you raspberrypi.org!), it was time to buy the parts. Thankfully, they’ve included a list of what you need to buy here.

Their list serves as a recommended starting point, but you’re free to buy your own sensors or parts as you wish. Their recommendations are a function of cost, availability, Python library support, reliability, and accuracy. They aren’t all the “best” sensors, but I believe after some research they’re good enough for my beginner purposes.

As I have no prior experience building…


I’ve always been fascinated with the weather. While writing code for pleasure, much of my work has centered around that very topic. Back in 2013, Jim Challenger and I built our first Rails app together: Where’s the Storm?, and in 2015 I rewrote it as Storm.ly. In both cases, we used the projects as a means to build something using real data. They were Rails apps that grabbed weather data from the DarkSky API (f.k.a. forecast.io), and displayed the forecast. Nothing too fancy, but it worked well enough for me that I was using WTS? and Storm.ly …

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store