Do you feel lucky? You shouldn’t.

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Whenever a user makes a new Ethereum wallet, the wallet is not ‘created,’ like a new file that wasn’t there before. Rather, the information is generated from possible addresses that ‘already exist’ on the blockchain. With Ethereum rapidly closing in on 100 million active and unique addresses (currently at ~88 million and climbing), it begs the question: What are the chances of generating an already active wallet that someone else is using?

First, let’s take a look at the form of public addresses on Ethereum: they are 40 hexadecimal characters, prefaced by a ‘0x’. …


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One of the largest obstacles to the widespread adoption of blockchain is the confusion it entails. Each person’s account on the blockchain is made up of a public address and private key, which are 42 and 64 characters long, respectively. Public addresses are meant to be the door leading to your account, meaning that you can send funds to a public address or receive funds through your own. These strings of characters look a lot like gibberish to most people and mistaking even one character can mean the loss of your funds forever, but they are the only way to interact with accounts and wallets. …


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What really put the Ethereum blockchain on the map and laid the foundation for countless tokens is the use of smart contract technology to automatically perform actions on the blockchain with no need for a middle-man. These automated contracts are built on code to provide an immutable method for a specific functionality, such as sending tokens when presented with an ETH deposit from a user.

Since smart contracts are versatile and immutable, they provide a secure and encouraging playground for new innovations. Wallets built on smart contract technology share the same tenacity, and they prove to be a promising alternative to traditional wallets. Part of the benefit of a smart contract wallet is less reliance on other mediums of recovery. Every wallet we’ve covered thus far in our wallet series has required some sort of data for recovery (and access) purposes, such as a private key or mnemonic phrase. …


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One of the most powerful use cases for Ethereum technology is the introduction of Dapps, which are decentralized applications built on smart contract technology that offer services without the need for third parties or centralized servers. Most wallets can interact with any Dapp directly through the use of contracts, but certain wallets are built specifically for easier Dapp functionality.

The ‘Browlet’ or CX Wallet

Currently, the most popular Dapps according to DappRadar are related to gaming and betting (not including DeFi Dapps like MakerDAO). These services are web based and can heavily depend on time-sensitive actions, but relying on these interactions through the direct use of smart contracts does not help facilitate mass adoption. …


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Ethereum smart contracts are coded contracts written in Solidity, or other compatible languages, that exist in a solely digital form. Their purpose is to perform a specific task without the need of a middleman through the use of the immutable code of the Ethereum blockchain. To read more about what smart contracts are capable of, check out this article here.

Every token that exists on the Ethereum Blockchain is tied to a smart contract, each with their own set of functions they use to perform tasks.

ERC20, which stands for ‘Ethereum Request for Comment’, is just one type of smart contract standard that exists within the Ethereum ecosystem, but it is by far the most recognizable. Understanding the framework of an ERC20 smart contract can help shed light on exactly what’s going on when you send transactions, participate in token sales, or even check your balance. …


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Being able to access your finances on the go has revolutionized how we communicate. Some people make their entire living from working online, and their mobile phones are a big part of that system. To move crypto adoption forward, the developer community is tapping into the potential of crypto wallets that are designed specifically for the smartphone. (If you are concerned that mobile apps are not compatible with financial security, take a look at this article — you might be surprised!)

There are so many mobile crypto apps to choose from out there, that it may be difficult to understand how they differ and what specific benefits they offer. …


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All wallets have differing levels of security. With so many ways to access a wallet, it can be difficult to figure out what makes some of them more secure. There are things you absolutely shouldn’t do, regardless of the type of wallet used — like enter your private information directly online. Some wallet creation methods leave the user vulnerable to phishing. Other access methods, like hardware wallets, are more difficult to mess up. Which brings us to…

The Private Tree

(You can read the full Private Tree article here.)


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In the crypto world, your wallet is essentially your identity. If you’re looking to interact with blockchain technology in one way or another, a wallet is your key to that world. However, there are many different wallets available, with more innovations introduced daily. This series will explore different types of wallets, organized into four main groups. But first, let’s take a look at what a wallet is.

In Ethereum, a wallet provides you with two main pieces of information: a public address (or multiple) for receiving funds and some sort of private information used for access. Public addresses take the form of a 42 character string, beginning with ‘0x’. The private information that comes with this address can be a private key (another string of 64 hexadecimal characters), a mnemonic phrase, or a keystore file. In addition, some wallets add a password or pin for daily wallet access. …


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One of the most useful features of Ethereum technology is its ability to host sub-currencies, known as ‘tokens’, directly on its blockchain. These tokens are each ruled by a smart contract, which self-executes commands based on a unique, immutable code.

There are several different types of tokens on the Ethereum blockchain, and multiple sub-categories exist within those types. We’ll take a quick look at the interesting variations of tokens, and address some aspects of their uses.

ERC20

The most common type of token launched on the Ethereum blockchain follows the ERC20 standard. ERC stands for ‘Ethereum Request for Comment’, which is basically a development proposal for the framework of the Ethereum blockchain. Ethereum is decentralized, so developers suggest new requests that are either abandoned or accepted by the community — the latter leading to widespread adoption of the protocol. …


Spoiler Alert: Every single one of these issues is preventable by the user…

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Humans are famously bad at learning from others’ mistakes, and we get it. Life is busy and full of information; it can be hard to retain words of warning when the danger is not happening directly to you. But it’s important to understand that these issues can and do occur every single day, and they can be avoided with a little bit of caution.

One of the best ways to learn is through repetition, so we’ve put together a list of top five issues that are most commonly addressed by our support team, and how they can (or can’t!) …

Stephen Wooldridge II

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