“Change and I”

Change and I haven’t been the best of pals over the years. Early on in life, we were staunch enemies. I took every precaution an Elementary School child could take to avoid it. I also took every stand I could take in opposition to the tyrant that was Change. It seemed as though it was a bully and I was always on the receiving end of its attention.

In High School, the relationship warmed slightly and I began to tolerate what needed to take place. Though I still wasn’t overly fond, Change began to show its benefits. We seemed to have reached a tolerable agreement. Yet — I still responded more in a reactionary manner.

It wasn’t until College that our true attachment bloomed. Here I realized how many amazing things Change brought about in my life. Simply reacting was no longer enough. Now I needed to proactively seek Change where it could be found.

As with most relationships, I feel like I have become a bit more comfortable over time in how I approach Change. Still pursuing, but more in an intentional fashion.

Thinking through our history together and the evolution of our interactions, I’ve settled on three simple questions that I always ask of Change when proactively seeking it. Whether in relationships, finances, or projects — these have served as ice-breakers for my conversations with Change.


“What isn’t happening that should be happening?”

Within any situation is there something that should be taking place that isn’t taking place?

“What is happening that shouldn’t be happening?”

Within any situation is there something that is taking place that shouldn’t be taking place?

“With what is happening, can it happen better?”

Within the current situation, is there any room for improvement?


Change loves these questions! Each helps to identify a different area where Change can have some impact. And, while I have learned that Change is often good, Change that provides value is guaranteed to be better. Using some simple questions to explore where that value is to be found can make all the difference when determining the ‘whats’ and ‘hows’ that come next.

I’m sure you’ve had your own experiences with Change. Change has never been one to be a stranger. What have you learned about proactively seeking out Change? Are there any other questions you have found handy? I’d love to hear!

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