Usually, we tend to read clever books to become better and smarter and find answers to difficult questions. And we forget and ignore old good fairy tales that might tell the truth we need in a much more simple and digestible way.

I have come to love two fairy tales because of how much they have to say to all grown-ups because they make us take a look at the problems and defects most of us suffer from, make us recognize them, and find the way to solve them.

“The Little Prince” by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

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I didn’t read the book when I was a kid. I read it as part of my learning English. And I’m so much thankful for that opportunity to read it while being an adult already. …


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Shorten work time to limit tasks to the important (Parkinson’s Law)

What 20% of sources are causing 80% of my problems and unhappiness?

What 20% of sources are resulting in 80% of my desired outcome and happiness?

People are poor judges of importance and inflate minutiae to fill time and feel important

Am I inventing things to do to avoid the important?

Dedication is often just meaningless work in disguise

Use impossibly short deadlines to force immediate action while ignoring minutiae

Being busy is most often used as a guise for avoiding the few critically important but uncomfortable actions

Ask for Forgiveness, Not Permission


Hi there. I just finished the “Black Box Thinking” book that was referenced by someone in the “Tribe of Mentors”. It was a fascinating reading full of revelations and I want to share my thoughts on it.

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The funny thing is that I was misled by the title at first, specifically by the “black box” part of it. …


I got to know about that book just recently from someone in the Internet and decided to give it a try. I didn’t have big expectations. But the result surprised me a lot. I never thought a single book can be of such huge value in different aspects of human life. Here are my key learnings from the book.

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What this book is about

Timothy Ferris, the author, sent out a bunch of very well thought-through questions to a bunch of some famous and outstanding persons that have achieved a lot in their life. The selection was broad, from writers to wrestlers to cryptocurrency geniuses. He got answers and compounded the book. …


It happens quite often to me that I run something in the terminal and then I need to stop it (quit) and I use the Ctrl-c key combination for that. I never really knew what’s happening under the hood at that moment and how this key combination works.

Turned out the way Ctrl-c works is quite simple — it’s just a shortcut key for sending the interrupt (terminate) signal SIGINT to the current process running in the foreground. Once the process gets that signal, it’s terminating itself and returns the user to the shell prompt.

What about Ctrl-z?

I found another interesting and probably useful key combination Ctrl-z. This combination sends SIGTSTP signal to the process (that is running in the foreground) and basically pauses the process and returns the user to the shell prompt. …


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In my previous article, I wrote about what the amazing tool Storybook is and how it helps frontend developers to be more productive and write more robust code. As with any other tool, there are some gotchas in using Storybook that you should be aware of. In this article, I want to tell about one of them — dealing with container components.

The Problem

Storybook allows rendering presentational (pure) components only. And it’s a good thing that forces you to separate concerns — put stateful logic into container components and using presentational components only for rendering UI, making them stateless.

However, there are situations when your presentational components’ children (immediate children or somewhere down the components hierarchy) are not stateless. For example, some child component can connect to API and fetch data. It means that your component is not truly pure component and can’t be rendered by Storybook. …


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I’ve been a user of Apple Photos for 8 months now, all collection of photos of my family is there. Its features like face recognition were mind-blowing to me. I wanted Apple to analyze and apply all its AI power to my photo library so that I can look at my photos at a different angle. I wanted Apple to teach me how I can use my photos differently.

Almost everything with Apple Photos suited me well up to a moment when my iPhone started to show symptoms of its age and its low storage 32GB began to irritate me reminding me often of having not enough space. So I began thinking of purchasing a new phone and Google Pixel was one of the options along the iPhones. Considering an iPhone-vs-Pixel topic you inevitably need to consider Apple Photos vs Google Photos topic. …


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Yesterday I moved my website to Netlify.

Now I have

  • automatic deployment (read continuous delivery)
  • dns management
  • https
  • hosting

all out-of-the-box and for FREE.

It’s amazing to see the progress in web-development, how frictionless and easy it gets to maintain your own website/webapps.

Continuous delivery


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Just heading back to Berlin from the beautiful Prague where I attended amazing ReactiveConf. It was first big conf I attended and I was impressed by the things I learnt, it was mind blowing.

Here are my key takeaways.

Types is a must have. No one is discussing if we need to use them. Now the topic of discussion shifted towards if we need to use typed languages like Closure, ReasonML or Elm with compilation to JavaScript.

State management is still hard. Redux vs MobX vs React Context vs RxJS.

Finite state machines (FSMs) and statecharts can be very helpful in visualising data flow and reasoning about the program. …


At one of the projects our team is working on we had huge performance problems in IE11 at some moment and here I want to share our experience how we resolved it.

The application had always been under active development and until some moment we tried to not pay much attention to performance issues. Our main target browser was Chrome and all seemed working fine. One day our business department said the main target browser is IE11 now and that it has huge performance problems we need to tackle somehow. I undertook to solve the problem.

To begin with…

To begin with, I decided to estimate the slowness of the application in IE11. I work remotely and don’t have a Windows machine at home, therefore I used BrowserStack to work with IE11. …

About

Alexey Antipov

A father of two. Software Engineer.

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