Moving to Industry

Part Two: Moving for Work

On a flight to San Jose in March, 2015

In hindsight, I’m glad I moved to Burnaby when I did. I really am. Not that I don’t love Nanaimo and everyone back home, I’m just glad I was able to rip off that “moving away from home” Band-Aid at an earlier age and without having to move too far.

Because it finally dawned on me.

In order for my career to move along, I’ll probably have to do so as well.

A few weeks into the semester, one of our instructors gave us her background in the beginning of her journalism career. When she graduated from her program, she received a two-month contract from CBC Toronto. Not the most secure offer, but an offer nonetheless, and she took it. After her contract was up, CBC Toronto offered another two-month contract, which she took once more. Two short term contracts later, she went on to work at CBC Toronto for five years.

Life moves fast eh?

My opinion on this could change within the next year and a half until I graduate (knock on wood). Right now I could move to Victoria, Vancouver, the Okanagan, anywhere on Vancouver Island, the mainland, or in Canada for a job offer and would be at peace with it. Huge opportunities can come from even the shortest of offers.

If you were to ask me if I would move anywhere out of BC for a job offer before having my first moving experience, I would have hopped on a plane to Boston, drink some tea, hold it in my mouth, fly all the way back home, and spit it out before laughing hysterically. I could talk the biggest game about being excited to move to any large market in Canada such as Toronto, Montreal, Calgary, etc. but would still be peeing my pants nervous on the inside.

Now? No big deal.

I know if I want to make a legitimate effort to go far in the news industry, I must be willing to move wherever I need be. Apologies in advance to my future wife and kids…

In part three we’re going to continue the theme of moving, and how the key difference to telling a story and creating a news segment is to go out in the world and get the story.

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