The problem: We need to get 80 per cent of the population vaccinated. But in a recent poll only 45 per cent of the population say they are certain to get the vaccination (just 35 per cent of those aged 35–44) with 18 per cent saying they definitely or probably would not.

The first two blogs in this series covered some thoughts on designing the programme to maximise take-up, and the communications campaign the NHS needs to run to get mass vaccination.

This blog is about what individuals can do to support and drive vaccine take-up. Here are five pointers.


We need to get 80 per cent of the population vaccinated. But in a recent poll only 45 per cent of the population say they are certain to get the vaccination (just 35 per cent of those aged 35–44) with 18 per cent saying they definitely or probably would not.

Much has been written about anti-vaccination propaganda. But far less about how to combat the seep of vaccine hesitancy into everyday life. UK vaccination campaigns have long been underpowered, and seemingly divorced from the communications best practice of other fields.

So with the wonderful prospect of a working vaccine for…


Here’s the problem. To get back to normal, we need to get 80 per cent of the population vaccinated. But in a recent poll only 45 per cent of the population say they are certain to get the vaccination (just 35 per cent of those aged 35–44) with 18 per cent saying they definitely or probably would not.

Let’s assume that a vaccine is proved to work, and the government can manage the rollout (a big assumption, given the concerns already expressed about the volume of cold storage and the staff required). …


This weekend, the TUC is 150. 1868 was another world in terms of work – as anyone reading the list of occupational unions who sent delegates to the first meeting in Manchester would recognise.

The sisters and brothers who founded the TUC and built their unions took a risk. They went against the way things had always been done and stepped out of the cosy consensus of their day. They created something new, using the best tools and tech at their disposal. And a century and a half later, we know that what they started transformed working people’s lives.

But…


In the US, yesterday was Labor Day. Wikipedia tells me that the bank holiday “honors the American labor movement and the contributions that workers have made to the strength, prosperity, laws and well-being of the country.”

UK trade union twitter certainly enjoys sharing US memes about the importance of trade unionism. I can’t be the only one to have seen the Pope and Bruce Springsteen enlisted in the cause.

But one thread runs throughout so many Labor Day articles: that without strong trade unions, neither society stands much chance of sharing prosperity with what my US colleagues call the “middle…


I wrote this piece for Sheffield University’s SPERI, as part of their partnership with OpenDemocracy on labour rights and worker organisation in the modern economy.


Yesterday, Lindsay’s boss asked her to work a double shift — again. Her tutor rang to find out why she’d missed her NVQ class — again. And a client, let down by the agency and left unwashed and hungry, rang in tears — again.

Sitting in Lindsay’s car, disturbed by the constant texts from her boss guilting her, I felt the pressure and the lack of control of her life. …


Let’s start with a few (relatively uncontroversial, ish) assertions:

Earlier today, the FT’s employment correspondent Sarah O’Connor (a champion of working people and a critical friend of trade unions) said:

The decline in youth membership is one consequence of a deeper problem for unions: the economy has changed more than they have.

This isn’t a new problem — and…


This is the note of a speech I gave last night to the #techforgood meetup in London, at the Google Campus. The event was organised by the Resolution Trust. With their partners Bethnal Green Ventures, they are about to launch a new funding and support offer for “civic ventures that use technology to support the low wage workforce”. I spoke after Gavin Kelly, who sets out the case for the programme here.

A note about why I decided to speak: if you, like me, believe in the union model, the continued criticism of unions for doing too little to organise…

Antonia Bance

TUC head of campaigns & comms. South-east Londoner.

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