I asked my four friends who happen to be entrepreneurs to share their favorite business read. Here’s what i got!

As a startup entrepreneur it’s impossible to find the time to read the bevy of books published each month on startup, entrepreneurship, business & leadership. A startup entrepreneur is busy running his/her own business — or an excited wantapreneur is laying the groundwork to launch a startup!

But then choosing the right ones is important to gain valuable insights that can seriously help march these wantapreneurs / entrepreneurs towards success.

So, in order to help all the literary-minded entrepreneurs out there narrow down their immense reading lists, I asked my friends who happen to be entrepreneurs to share their favorite business read.

Here’s the list, only four friends have reverted back. I have read few listed here but would really want to read all of them. More to follow.

How many have you read?

One

The Leader Who Had No Title: A Modern Fable on Real Success in Business and in Life

For more than fifteen years, Robin Sharma has been quietly sharing with Fortune 500 companies and many of the super-rich a success formula that has made him one of the most sought-after leadership advisers in the world. Now, for the first time, Sharma makes his proprietary process available to you, so that you can get to your absolute best while helping your organization break through to a dramatically new level of winning in these wildly uncertain times.

In “The Leader Who Had No Title, “you will learn:

- How to work with and influence people like a superstar, regardless of your position

- A method to recognize and then seize opportunities in times of deep change

- The real secrets of intense innovation

- An instant strategy to build a great team and become a “merchant of wow” with your customers

- Hard-hitting tactics to become mentally strong and physically tough enough to lead your field

- Real-world ways to defeat stress, build an unbeatable mind-set, unleash energy, and balance your personal life

Regardless of what you do within your organization and the current circumstances of your life, the single most important fact is that you have the power to show leadership. Wherever you are in your career or life, you should always play to your peak abilities. This book shows you how to claim that staggering power, as well as transform your life — and the world around you — in the process.

Two

Adapt: Why Success Always Starts with Failure

In this groundbreaking book, Tim Harford, the Undercover Economist, shows us a new and inspiring approach to solving the most pressing problems in our lives. When faced with complex situations, we have all become accustomed to looking to our leaders to set out a plan of action and blaze a path to success. Harford argues that today’s challenges simply cannot be tackled with ready-made solutions and expert opinion; the world has become far too unpredictable and profoundly complex. Instead, we must “adapt.”

Deftly weaving together psychology, evolutionary biology, anthropology, physics, and economics, along with the compelling story of hard-won lessons learned in the field, Harford makes a passionate case for the importance of adaptive trial and error in tackling issues such as climate change, poverty, and financial crises — as well as in fostering innovation and creativity in our business and personal lives.

Taking us from corporate boardrooms to the deserts of Iraq, “Adapt “clearly explains the necessary ingredients for turning failure into success. It is a breakthrough handbook for surviving — and prospering — in our complex and ever-shifting world.

Three

Stand Out: How to Find Your Breakthrough Idea and Build a Following Around It

Standing out is no longer optional

Too many people believe that if they keep their heads down and work hard, they ll be recognized on the merits of their work. But that s simply not true anymore. Safe jobs disappear daily, and the clamor of everyday life drowns out ordinary contributions. To make a name for yourself, to create true job security, and to make a difference in the world, you have to share your unique perspective and inspire others to take action.But in a noisy world where it seems everything s been said and shouted from the rooftops how can your ideas stand out?

Fortunately, you don t have to be a genius ora worldwide superstar to make an impact. Drawing on interviews with more than fifty thought leaders in fields ranging from business to genomics to urban planning, Dorie Clark shows how these masters achieved success and how anyone with hard work can do the same.Whether it s learning to ask the right questions, developing and building on an expert niche, or combining disparate fields to get a new perspective, Clark outlines ways to develop the ideas that set you apart.
Of course, having a breakthrough insight is only half the battle. If you really want to share your ideas, you have to find a way to build an audience, communicate your message, and inspire others to embrace your vision. Starting small is fine; Clark provides a step-by-step guide to help you leverage your existing networks, attract new people to your cause, and, ultimately, build a community around your ideas.

Featuring vivid examples based on interviews with influencers such as Seth God in, David Allen, and Daniel Pink, Clark shows you how to break through and ensure that your ideas get noticed. Becoming a thought leader in your company or in your profession is the ultimate career insurance. But even more important it s also a chance to change the world for the better. Whatever your cause, perspective, or point of view, the world can t afford for the best ideas to remain buried inside you. Whether it s how to improve the educational system or how to make your company more efficient, your ideas matter. The world needs your insights, and it s time to be bold.”

Four

Above the Line: Lessons in Leadership and Life from a Championship Season

Remarkable lessons in leadership and team building from one of the greatest college football coaches of our times.

In only thirteen years as a head football coach, first at Bowling Green and then at Utah, Florida, and Ohio State, Urban Meyer has established himself as one of the elite coaches in the annals of his sport, with three national championships and a cumulative record of 142 wins and only 26 losses. But sheer statistics are not the measure of his true accomplishment, nor do they speak to his own extraordinary learning journey. Now, in “Above the Line,” he offers to readers his unparalleled insights into leadership, team building and the keys to empowering people to achieve things they might never have thought possible.

Despite winning two national championships at Florida in only six seasons, Meyer stepped back from the game at the end of the 2010 season, amid health concerns and a growing awareness that his almost maniacal pursuit of perfection was distorting his priorities, distancing him from his family and taking him away from the reasons he wanted to coach in the first place. When he returned to the sport in 2012 as the head coach at Ohio State, the school he grew up rooting for, Meyer did so with a renewed sense of the deeper purpose of his work and a profound commitment to life balance that had previously been lacking. What remained constant was his passion for leading, teaching and motivating, forging his football teams into a cohesive whole, playing for one another with selfless commitment and uncommon intensity.

Ohio State s 2014 season was in many ways Urban Meyer s master class in leadership. The world knows how the story ended: with the Buckeyes capturing the inaugural College Football Playoff Championship with a 42 20 victory over Oregon, with the team s third-string quarterback at the helm, in only his third collegiate start. Few remember how it began: with a bad early season loss that sent OSU out of the Top 20, season-ending injuries at the most important position on the team, and then, infinitely worse, the tragic death of a teammate. But this team s resilience was no accident. In “Above the Line,” Urban Meyer shares with readers OSU s groundbreaking game plan the game plan he followed every day in the Buckeyes historic 2014 season for creating a culture of success that engages and inspires the people around them

A student of psychology long before he became a coach, Meyer believes that trust is the bedrock of great achievements and healthy relationships, and explains how to build it, step by step whether in a team, a family, or a Fortune 500 company. With trust in place, a deep bond unites us in common purpose, and cultivates what he calls “Above the Line” behavior a learned, empowered response to the challenges we face every day.

Writing with his customary candor and humility, Meyer delivers insights both practical and profound and applicable far beyond the football field. Packed with real-life examples from a storied season, “Above the Line” offers wisdom and inspiration for taking control and turning setbacks into victories.”

Five

The Founder’s Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup

Often downplayed in the excitement of starting up a new business venture is one of the most important decisions entrepreneurs will face: should they go it alone, or bring in cofounders, hires, and investors to help build the business? More than just financial rewards are at stake. Friendships and relationships can suffer. Bad decisions at the inception of a promising venture lay the foundations for its eventual ruin. “The Founder’s Dilemmas” is the first book to examine the early decisions by entrepreneurs that can make or break a startup and its team.

Drawing on a decade of research, Noam Wasserman reveals the common pitfalls founders face and how to avoid them. He looks at whether it is a good idea to cofound with friends or relatives, how and when to split the equity within the founding team, and how to recognize when a successful founder-CEO should exit or be fired. Wasserman explains how to anticipate, avoid, or recover from disastrous mistakes that can splinter a founding team, strip founders of control, and leave founders without a financial payoff for their hard work and innovative ideas. He highlights the need at each step to strike a careful balance between controlling the startup and attracting the best resources to grow it, and demonstrates why the easy short-term choice is often the most perilous in the long term.

“The Founder’s Dilemmas” draws on the inside stories of founders like Evan Williams of Twitter and Tim Westergren of Pandora, while mining quantitative data on almost ten thousand founders.

People problems are the leading cause of failure in startups. This book offers solutions.

Six

What Should I Do with My Life?: The True Story of People Who Answered the Ultimate Question | I love this one! (MUST READ)

In “What Should I Do with My Life”? Po Bronson tells the inspirational true stories of people who have found the most meaningful answers to that great question. With humor, empathy, and insight, Bronson writes of remarkable individuals from young to old, from those just starting out to those in a second career who have overcome fear and confusion to find a larger truth about their lives and, in doing so, have been transformed by the experience. “What Should I Do with My Life?” struck a powerful, resonant chord on publication, causing a multitude of people to rethink their vocations and priorities and start on the path to finding their true place in the world. For this edition, Bronson has added nine new profiles, to further reflect the range and diversity of those who broke away from the chorus to learn the sound of their own voice.

Seven

More Awesome Than Money: Four Boys and Their Quest to Save the World from Facebook

David versus Goliath in Silicon Valley an epic attempt to take back the Internet

Their idea was simple. Four NYU undergrads wanted to build a social network that would allow users to control their personal data, instead of surrendering it to big businesses like Facebook. They called it Diaspora. In days, they raised $200,000, and reporters, venture capitalists, and the digital community s most legendary figures were soon monitoring their progress. Max dreamed of being a CEO. Ilya was the idealist. Dan coded like a pro, and Rafi tried to keep them all on track. But as the months passed and the money ran out, the Diaspora Four fell victim to errors, bad decisions, and their own hubris. In November 2011, Ilya committed suicide.

Diaspora has been tech news since day one, but the story reaches far beyond Silicon Valley to the now urgent issues about the future of the Internet. With the cooperation of the surviving partners, “New York Times” bestselling author Jim Dwyer tells a riveting story of four ambitious and naIve young men who tried to rebottle the genie of personal privacy and paid the ultimate price.”

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